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Comparison of plasma disposition of alkaloids after lupine challenge in cattle that had given birth to calves with lupine-induced arthrogryposis or clinically normal calves

Clive C. GayField Disease Investigation Unit, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6610.

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 DVM, MVSc
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Kip E. PanterUSDA Poisonous Plant Research Laboratory, 1150 E 14 N, Logan, UT 84321.

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 PhD
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Katrina L. MealeyField Disease Investigation Unit, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6610.

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John M. GayField Disease Investigation Unit, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6610.

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 DVM, PhD
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Steven W. HjartarsonField Disease Investigation Unit, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6610.

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Ahmed TibaryField Disease Investigation Unit, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6610.

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Ernie S. MotteramField Disease Investigation Unit, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6610.

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Terrie WierengaUSDA Poisonous Plant Research Laboratory, 1150 E 14 N, Logan, UT 84321.

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Lynn F. JamesUSDA Poisonous Plant Research Laboratory, 1150 E 14 N, Logan, UT 84321.

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Abstract

Objective—To compare plasma disposition of alkaloids after lupine challenge in cattle that had given birth to calves with lupine-induced arthrogryposis and cattle that had given birth to clinically normal calves and determine whether the difference in outcome was associated with differences in plasma disposition of anagyrine.

Animals—6 cows that had given birth to calves with arthrogryposis and 6 cows that had given birth to clinically normal calves after being similarly exposed to lupine during pregnancy.

Procedure—Dried lupine (2 g/kg) was administered via gavage. Blood samples were collected before and at various time points for 48 hours after lupine administration. Anagyrine, 5,6-dehydrolupanine, and lupanine concentrations in plasma were measured by use of gas chromatography. Plasma alkaloid concentration versus time curves were generated for each alkaloid, and pharmacokinetic parameters were determined for each cow.

Results—No significant differences in area under the plasma concentration versus time curve, maximum plasma concentration, time to reach maximum plasma concentration, and mean residence time for the 3 alkaloids were found between groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Because no differences were found in plasma disposition of anagyrine following lupine challenge between cattle that had given birth to calves with arthrogryposis and those that had not, our findings do not support the hypothesis that between-cow differences in plasma disposition of anagyrine account for within-herd differences in risk for lupine-induced arthrogryposis. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:1580–1583)

Abstract

Objective—To compare plasma disposition of alkaloids after lupine challenge in cattle that had given birth to calves with lupine-induced arthrogryposis and cattle that had given birth to clinically normal calves and determine whether the difference in outcome was associated with differences in plasma disposition of anagyrine.

Animals—6 cows that had given birth to calves with arthrogryposis and 6 cows that had given birth to clinically normal calves after being similarly exposed to lupine during pregnancy.

Procedure—Dried lupine (2 g/kg) was administered via gavage. Blood samples were collected before and at various time points for 48 hours after lupine administration. Anagyrine, 5,6-dehydrolupanine, and lupanine concentrations in plasma were measured by use of gas chromatography. Plasma alkaloid concentration versus time curves were generated for each alkaloid, and pharmacokinetic parameters were determined for each cow.

Results—No significant differences in area under the plasma concentration versus time curve, maximum plasma concentration, time to reach maximum plasma concentration, and mean residence time for the 3 alkaloids were found between groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Because no differences were found in plasma disposition of anagyrine following lupine challenge between cattle that had given birth to calves with arthrogryposis and those that had not, our findings do not support the hypothesis that between-cow differences in plasma disposition of anagyrine account for within-herd differences in risk for lupine-induced arthrogryposis. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:1580–1583)