Evaluation of hepatosplanchnic circulation and intestinal oxygenation in dogs with a condition that mimicked septic shock induced by continuous infusion of a low dose of lipopolysaccharide

Yoko Sakaue Division of Veterinary Surgery, Nippon Veterinary and Animal Science University, 1-7-1 Kyonan-cho, Musashino-shi, Tokyo, 180-8602, Japan.

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Yoshinori Nezu Division of Veterinary Surgery, Nippon Veterinary and Animal Science University, 1-7-1 Kyonan-cho, Musashino-shi, Tokyo, 180-8602, Japan.

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Shinobu Komori Division of Veterinary Surgery, Nippon Veterinary and Animal Science University, 1-7-1 Kyonan-cho, Musashino-shi, Tokyo, 180-8602, Japan.

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Yasushi Hara Division of Veterinary Surgery, Nippon Veterinary and Animal Science University, 1-7-1 Kyonan-cho, Musashino-shi, Tokyo, 180-8602, Japan.

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Masahiro Tagawa Division of Veterinary Surgery, Nippon Veterinary and Animal Science University, 1-7-1 Kyonan-cho, Musashino-shi, Tokyo, 180-8602, Japan.

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Ryo Ogawa Division of Anesthesiology, Nippon Medical School, 1-5-1 Sendagi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8603, Japan.

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Abstract

Objective—To determine whether continuous infusion of a low dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce a condition mimicking septic shock in dogs would affect systemic and hepatosplanchnic circulation and oxygenation.

Animals—12 healthy adult Beagles.

Procedure—Dogs received a low dose of LPS (Escherichia coli O55:B5) by continuous IV infusion at a rate of 1 µg/kg/h for 8 hours. Systemic hemodynamics; systemic oxygenation; blood flow in the cranial mesenteric artery, common hepatic artery, and portal vein; intestinal and hepatic tissue blood flow; mesenteric oxygenation; and intramucosal PCO2 were examined before and at selected time points after onset of the LPS infusion.

Results—After onset of the LPS infusion, cardiac index increased and mean arterial pressure (MAP) and systemic vascular resistance decreased, which is characteristic of the hyperdynamic state in septic patients. Hepatosplanchnic blood flow increased during the hyperdynamic state. Intestinal PCO2 was increased even when blood flows increased. During the latter half of the experimental period, MAP was maintained but hepatosplanchnic blood flows decreased and intestinal PCO2 increased further.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Analysis of the results suggested that hepatosplanchnic blood flow enters the hyperdynamic state during the early stages of sepsis and that intestinal tissue oxygenation is threatened even when hepatosplanchnic blood flow is increased or maintained. Hence, improvement of hepatosplanchnic circulation and intestinal tissue oxygenation is important in dogs with clinical evidence of a septic condition. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:1347–1354)

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether continuous infusion of a low dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce a condition mimicking septic shock in dogs would affect systemic and hepatosplanchnic circulation and oxygenation.

Animals—12 healthy adult Beagles.

Procedure—Dogs received a low dose of LPS (Escherichia coli O55:B5) by continuous IV infusion at a rate of 1 µg/kg/h for 8 hours. Systemic hemodynamics; systemic oxygenation; blood flow in the cranial mesenteric artery, common hepatic artery, and portal vein; intestinal and hepatic tissue blood flow; mesenteric oxygenation; and intramucosal PCO2 were examined before and at selected time points after onset of the LPS infusion.

Results—After onset of the LPS infusion, cardiac index increased and mean arterial pressure (MAP) and systemic vascular resistance decreased, which is characteristic of the hyperdynamic state in septic patients. Hepatosplanchnic blood flow increased during the hyperdynamic state. Intestinal PCO2 was increased even when blood flows increased. During the latter half of the experimental period, MAP was maintained but hepatosplanchnic blood flows decreased and intestinal PCO2 increased further.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Analysis of the results suggested that hepatosplanchnic blood flow enters the hyperdynamic state during the early stages of sepsis and that intestinal tissue oxygenation is threatened even when hepatosplanchnic blood flow is increased or maintained. Hence, improvement of hepatosplanchnic circulation and intestinal tissue oxygenation is important in dogs with clinical evidence of a septic condition. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:1347–1354)

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