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Relationship of bispectral index to minimum alveolar concentration multiples of sevoflurane in cats

Leigh A. LamontDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.
Present address is Department of Companion Animals, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PEI C1A 4P3, Canada.

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Stephen A GreeneDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.

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Kurt A. GrimmDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.

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William J. TranquilliDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.

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Abstract

Objective—To determine the relationship between bispectral index (BIS) and minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) multiples of sevoflurane in cats.

Animals—8 domestic cats.

Procedure—Each cat was anesthetized twice with sevoflurane. First, the MAC of sevoflurane for each cat was determined by use of the tail clamp method. Second, cats were anesthetized with sevoflurane at each of 5 MAC multiples administered in random order. Ventilation was controlled, and after a 15- minute equilibration period at each MAC multiple of sevoflurane, BIS data were collected for 5 minutes and the median value of BIS calculated.

Results—The mean (± SD) MAC of sevoflurane was 3.3 ± 0.2%. The BIS values at 0.5 MAC could not be recorded as a result of spontaneous movement in all 8 cats. The BIS values at 2.0 MAC were confounded by burst suppression in all 8 cats. Over the range of 0.8 to 1.5 MAC, BIS values decreased significantly with increasing end-tidal sevoflurane concentrations. Mean (± SD) BIS measurements were 30 ± 3, 21 ± 3, and 5 ± 2 at 0.8, 1.0, and 1.5 MAC, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Values of BIS are inversely and linearly related to end-tidal sevoflurane concentrations in anesthetized cats, and BIS may be a useful predictor of CNS depression in this species. The consistently low BIS values recorded in this study suggest that clinical BIS end points used to titrate anesthetic agents in humans may not be applicable to cats. ( Am J Vet Res 2004;65:93–98)

Abstract

Objective—To determine the relationship between bispectral index (BIS) and minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) multiples of sevoflurane in cats.

Animals—8 domestic cats.

Procedure—Each cat was anesthetized twice with sevoflurane. First, the MAC of sevoflurane for each cat was determined by use of the tail clamp method. Second, cats were anesthetized with sevoflurane at each of 5 MAC multiples administered in random order. Ventilation was controlled, and after a 15- minute equilibration period at each MAC multiple of sevoflurane, BIS data were collected for 5 minutes and the median value of BIS calculated.

Results—The mean (± SD) MAC of sevoflurane was 3.3 ± 0.2%. The BIS values at 0.5 MAC could not be recorded as a result of spontaneous movement in all 8 cats. The BIS values at 2.0 MAC were confounded by burst suppression in all 8 cats. Over the range of 0.8 to 1.5 MAC, BIS values decreased significantly with increasing end-tidal sevoflurane concentrations. Mean (± SD) BIS measurements were 30 ± 3, 21 ± 3, and 5 ± 2 at 0.8, 1.0, and 1.5 MAC, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Values of BIS are inversely and linearly related to end-tidal sevoflurane concentrations in anesthetized cats, and BIS may be a useful predictor of CNS depression in this species. The consistently low BIS values recorded in this study suggest that clinical BIS end points used to titrate anesthetic agents in humans may not be applicable to cats. ( Am J Vet Res 2004;65:93–98)