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Effect of intranasal exposure to leukotoxindeficient Mannheimia haemolytica at the time of arrival at the feedyard on subsequent isolation of M haemolytica from nasal secretions of calves

Glynn H. Frank DVM, PhD1, Robert E. Briggs DVM, MS2, Glenn C. Duff PhD3,4, and H. Scott Hurd DVM, PhD5
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  • 1 USDA, Agriculture Research Service, National Animal Disease Center, PO Box 70, Ames, IA 50010.
  • | 2 USDA, Agriculture Research Service, National Animal Disease Center, PO Box 70, Ames, IA 50010.
  • | 3 Clayton Livestock Research Center, Department of Animal and Range Sciences, New Mexico State University, Clayton, NM 88415.
  • | 4 Present address: Department of Animal Sciences, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0038.
  • | 5 USDA, Agriculture Research Service, National Animal Disease Center, PO Box 70, Ames, IA 50010.

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of intranasal exposure to live leukotoxin (LktA)-deficient Mannheimia haemolytica (MH) at the time of feedyard arrival on nasopharyngeal colonization by wildtype MH in calves.

Animals—200 calves.

Procedure—Calves from Arkansas (AR calves; n = 100; mean body weight, 205 kg) were purchased from an order buyer barn. Calves from New Mexico (NM calves; n = 100; mean body weight, 188 kg) were obtained from a single ranch. Calves were transported to a feedyard, where half of each group was exposed intranasally with LktA-deficient MH at the time of arrival. Calves were observed daily for respiratory tract disease (RTD), and nasal swab specimens were collected periodically to determine nasopharyngeal colonization status with MH. Serum samples were assayed for antibodies to MH.

Results—15 AR calves had nasopharyngeal colonization by wild-type MH at the order buyer barn, whereas none of the NM calves had nasopharyngeal colonization. Intranasal exposure to LktA-deficient MH elicited an increase in serum antibody titers against MH in NM calves, but titers were less in NM calves treated for RTD. Exposure of NM calves to LktA-deficient MH offered protection from nasopharyngeal colonization by wild-type MH.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Exposure of calves to LktA-deficient MH elicited an increase in serum antibody titers against MH and decreased colonization of the nasopharynx by wild-type MH. Earlier exposure would likely allow an immune response to develop before transportation and offer protection from nasopharyngeal colonization and pneumonia caused by wild-type MH. ( Am J Vet Res 2003;64:580–585)

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of intranasal exposure to live leukotoxin (LktA)-deficient Mannheimia haemolytica (MH) at the time of feedyard arrival on nasopharyngeal colonization by wildtype MH in calves.

Animals—200 calves.

Procedure—Calves from Arkansas (AR calves; n = 100; mean body weight, 205 kg) were purchased from an order buyer barn. Calves from New Mexico (NM calves; n = 100; mean body weight, 188 kg) were obtained from a single ranch. Calves were transported to a feedyard, where half of each group was exposed intranasally with LktA-deficient MH at the time of arrival. Calves were observed daily for respiratory tract disease (RTD), and nasal swab specimens were collected periodically to determine nasopharyngeal colonization status with MH. Serum samples were assayed for antibodies to MH.

Results—15 AR calves had nasopharyngeal colonization by wild-type MH at the order buyer barn, whereas none of the NM calves had nasopharyngeal colonization. Intranasal exposure to LktA-deficient MH elicited an increase in serum antibody titers against MH in NM calves, but titers were less in NM calves treated for RTD. Exposure of NM calves to LktA-deficient MH offered protection from nasopharyngeal colonization by wild-type MH.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Exposure of calves to LktA-deficient MH elicited an increase in serum antibody titers against MH and decreased colonization of the nasopharynx by wild-type MH. Earlier exposure would likely allow an immune response to develop before transportation and offer protection from nasopharyngeal colonization and pneumonia caused by wild-type MH. ( Am J Vet Res 2003;64:580–585)