Advertisement

Effect of bone diameter and eccentric loading on fatigue life of cortical screws used with interlocking nails

Rhonda L. Aper DVM, MS1, Alan S. Litsky MD, ScD2, Simon C. Roe BVSc, PhD3, and Kenneth A. Johnson MVSc, PhD4
View More View Less
  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
  • | 2 Biomedical Engineering Center, College of Engineering, and the Orthopaedic BioMaterials Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedics, College of Medicine and Public Health, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
  • | 3 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695.
  • | 4 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

Abstract

Objective—To test the effects of bone diameter and eccentric loading on fatigue life of 2.7-mm-diameter cortical bone screws used for locking a 6-mm-diameter interlocking nail.

Sample Population—Eighteen 2.7-mm-diameter cortical bone screws.

Procedure—A simulated bone model with aluminum tubing and a 6-mm-diameter interlocking nail was used to load screws in cyclic 3-point bending. Group 1 included 6 screws that were centrally loaded within 19-mm-diameter aluminum tubing. Group 2 included 6 screws that were centrally loaded within 31.8-mmdiameter aluminum tubing. Group 3 included 6 screws that were eccentrically loaded (5.5 mm from center) within 31.8-mm-diameter aluminum tubing. The number of cycles until screw failure and the mode of failure were recorded.

Results—An increase in the diameter of the aluminum tubing from 19 to 31.8 mm resulted in a significant decrease in the number of cycles to failure (mean ± SD, 761,215 ± 239,853 to 16,941 ± 2,829 cycles, respectively). Within 31.8-mm tubing, the number of cycles of failure of eccentrically loaded screws (43,068 ± 14,073 cycles) was significantly greater than that of centrally loaded screws (16,941 ± 2,829 cycles).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Within a bone, locking screws are subjected to different loading conditions depending on location (diaphyseal vs metaphyseal). The fatigue life of a locking screw centrally loaded in the metaphyseal region of bone may be shorter than in the diaphysis. Eccentric loading of the locking screw in the metaphysis may help to improve its fatigue life. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:569–573)

Abstract

Objective—To test the effects of bone diameter and eccentric loading on fatigue life of 2.7-mm-diameter cortical bone screws used for locking a 6-mm-diameter interlocking nail.

Sample Population—Eighteen 2.7-mm-diameter cortical bone screws.

Procedure—A simulated bone model with aluminum tubing and a 6-mm-diameter interlocking nail was used to load screws in cyclic 3-point bending. Group 1 included 6 screws that were centrally loaded within 19-mm-diameter aluminum tubing. Group 2 included 6 screws that were centrally loaded within 31.8-mmdiameter aluminum tubing. Group 3 included 6 screws that were eccentrically loaded (5.5 mm from center) within 31.8-mm-diameter aluminum tubing. The number of cycles until screw failure and the mode of failure were recorded.

Results—An increase in the diameter of the aluminum tubing from 19 to 31.8 mm resulted in a significant decrease in the number of cycles to failure (mean ± SD, 761,215 ± 239,853 to 16,941 ± 2,829 cycles, respectively). Within 31.8-mm tubing, the number of cycles of failure of eccentrically loaded screws (43,068 ± 14,073 cycles) was significantly greater than that of centrally loaded screws (16,941 ± 2,829 cycles).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Within a bone, locking screws are subjected to different loading conditions depending on location (diaphyseal vs metaphyseal). The fatigue life of a locking screw centrally loaded in the metaphyseal region of bone may be shorter than in the diaphysis. Eccentric loading of the locking screw in the metaphysis may help to improve its fatigue life. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:569–573)