Use of the bispectral index as a monitor of anesthetic depth in cats anesthetized with isoflurane

Philip A. March Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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 DVM, MS
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William W. Muir III Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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 DVM, PhD

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether the prestimulation bispectral index (BIS) value or relative change in BIS after noxious stimulation can be used to assess the depth of isoflurane anesthesia in cats.

Animals—17 healthy female cats.

Procedure—Electroencephalogram (EEG) patterns and BIS values were examined in cats that received increasing end-tidal (ET) isoflurane concentrations. Subsequently, BIS values were determined before and after either a noxious somatic or visceral stimulus in cats that received ET isoflurane concentrations ranging from 1.8% to 2.4%. Electrical stimuli of the tail base and bladder distension to 50 cm of water were the somatic and visceral stimuli, respectively.

Results—The resting BIS at ET isoflurane concentrations from 1.4% to 1.9% steadily decreased concurrently with increasing degrees of EEG suppression. Prestimulation BIS values, however, were not related to 1.8% to 2.4% ET isoflurane concentrations and not useful for prediction of BIS values or hemodynamic and movement responses after a noxious stimulus. The poststimulation BIS value and the difference between mean BIS values before and after stimulation were inversely correlated with increasing ET isoflurane concentrations. Poststimulation BIS values > 60 were observed at ET isoflurane concentrations greater than those associated with a movement response after a stimulus.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The prestimulation BIS value has limited use in assessing anesthetic depth in cats during isoflurane anesthesia. The change in BIS values after a noxious somatic or visceral stimulus was a reliable measure of anesthetic depth and may be a useful measure of early arousal from the hypnotic state. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:1534–1541)

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether the prestimulation bispectral index (BIS) value or relative change in BIS after noxious stimulation can be used to assess the depth of isoflurane anesthesia in cats.

Animals—17 healthy female cats.

Procedure—Electroencephalogram (EEG) patterns and BIS values were examined in cats that received increasing end-tidal (ET) isoflurane concentrations. Subsequently, BIS values were determined before and after either a noxious somatic or visceral stimulus in cats that received ET isoflurane concentrations ranging from 1.8% to 2.4%. Electrical stimuli of the tail base and bladder distension to 50 cm of water were the somatic and visceral stimuli, respectively.

Results—The resting BIS at ET isoflurane concentrations from 1.4% to 1.9% steadily decreased concurrently with increasing degrees of EEG suppression. Prestimulation BIS values, however, were not related to 1.8% to 2.4% ET isoflurane concentrations and not useful for prediction of BIS values or hemodynamic and movement responses after a noxious stimulus. The poststimulation BIS value and the difference between mean BIS values before and after stimulation were inversely correlated with increasing ET isoflurane concentrations. Poststimulation BIS values > 60 were observed at ET isoflurane concentrations greater than those associated with a movement response after a stimulus.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The prestimulation BIS value has limited use in assessing anesthetic depth in cats during isoflurane anesthesia. The change in BIS values after a noxious somatic or visceral stimulus was a reliable measure of anesthetic depth and may be a useful measure of early arousal from the hypnotic state. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:1534–1541)

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