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Effect of darglitazone on glucose clearance and lipid metabolism in obese cats

Margarethe HoenigDepartment of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

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 Dr med vet, PhD
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Duncan C. FergusonDepartment of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

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 VMD, PhD

Abstract

Objective—To examine the effect of darglitazone, a compound of the thiazolidinedione class, on glucose clearance and lipid metabolism in obese cats.

Animals—18 obese and 4 lean adult neutered female cats.

Procedure—IV glucose tolerance tests with measurements of glucose, insulin, and nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations were performed before and 42 days after daily administration of darglitazone (9 obese cats) or placebo (9 obese and 4 lean cats). Additionally, cholesterol, triglyceride, leptin, and glycosylated hemoglobin concentrations were measured.

Results—Darglitazone-treated cats had significantly lower cholesterol, triglyceride, and leptin concentrations, compared with placebo-treated obese cats. A significant decrease in the area under the curve for NEFAs, glucose, and insulin during an IV glucose tolerance test was seen in darglitazone-treated cats. The drug was well tolerated.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The response of obese cats to darglitazone was similar to the response to thiazolidinediones in obese humans and rodents Darglitazone was effective in improving insulin sensitivity and glucose and lipid metabolism in obese cats. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:1409–1413)

Abstract

Objective—To examine the effect of darglitazone, a compound of the thiazolidinedione class, on glucose clearance and lipid metabolism in obese cats.

Animals—18 obese and 4 lean adult neutered female cats.

Procedure—IV glucose tolerance tests with measurements of glucose, insulin, and nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations were performed before and 42 days after daily administration of darglitazone (9 obese cats) or placebo (9 obese and 4 lean cats). Additionally, cholesterol, triglyceride, leptin, and glycosylated hemoglobin concentrations were measured.

Results—Darglitazone-treated cats had significantly lower cholesterol, triglyceride, and leptin concentrations, compared with placebo-treated obese cats. A significant decrease in the area under the curve for NEFAs, glucose, and insulin during an IV glucose tolerance test was seen in darglitazone-treated cats. The drug was well tolerated.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The response of obese cats to darglitazone was similar to the response to thiazolidinediones in obese humans and rodents Darglitazone was effective in improving insulin sensitivity and glucose and lipid metabolism in obese cats. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:1409–1413)