Advertisement

Radiographic findings before and after oral administration of a magnet in cows with traumatic reticuloperitonitis

Ueli Braun Prof Dr med vet1, Barbara Gansohr Dr med vet2, and Mark Flückiger PD Dr med vet3
View More View Less
  • 1 Department of Farm Animals, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 260, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland.
  • | 2 Department of Farm Animals, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 260, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland.
  • | 3 Department of Small Animals, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 260, CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate by use of radiography the efficacy of oral administration of magnets in the treatment of traumatic reticuloperitonitis in cows.

Animals—90 cows referred because of indigestion.

Procedure—Radiography of the reticulum was performed. In all cows, radiographic findings revealed a metal foreign body in the reticulum. A magnet was administered orally, and the reticulum was again radiographed to assess the position of the magnet and to determine whether the foreign body was attached to the magnet.

Results—The magnet was observed in the reticulum in 75 cows and in the cranial aspect of the dorsal sac of the rumen in 9 cows; in 6 cows, the magnet was not observed. The foreign body was fully attached to the magnet in 49 cows. In 6 cows, the foreign body was in contact with the magnet but still penetrated the reticulum. In 24 cows, the foreign body did not contact the magnet, and in 11 cows, it was not clear whether the foreign body was attached to the magnet. A foreign body at an angle to the ventral aspect of the reticulum of > 30° was less likely to become attached to a magnet, compared with a foreign body situated horizontally on the ventral aspect of the reticulum. A foreign body with no contact to the ventral aspect of the reticulum or a perforating foreign body was also less likely to become attached to a magnet.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Position of the foreign body within the reticulum greatly influences the efficacy of treatment with a magnet. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:115–120)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate by use of radiography the efficacy of oral administration of magnets in the treatment of traumatic reticuloperitonitis in cows.

Animals—90 cows referred because of indigestion.

Procedure—Radiography of the reticulum was performed. In all cows, radiographic findings revealed a metal foreign body in the reticulum. A magnet was administered orally, and the reticulum was again radiographed to assess the position of the magnet and to determine whether the foreign body was attached to the magnet.

Results—The magnet was observed in the reticulum in 75 cows and in the cranial aspect of the dorsal sac of the rumen in 9 cows; in 6 cows, the magnet was not observed. The foreign body was fully attached to the magnet in 49 cows. In 6 cows, the foreign body was in contact with the magnet but still penetrated the reticulum. In 24 cows, the foreign body did not contact the magnet, and in 11 cows, it was not clear whether the foreign body was attached to the magnet. A foreign body at an angle to the ventral aspect of the reticulum of > 30° was less likely to become attached to a magnet, compared with a foreign body situated horizontally on the ventral aspect of the reticulum. A foreign body with no contact to the ventral aspect of the reticulum or a perforating foreign body was also less likely to become attached to a magnet.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Position of the foreign body within the reticulum greatly influences the efficacy of treatment with a magnet. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:115–120)