Relationship of vitamin E supplementation and antimicrobial treatment with acute-phase protein responses in cattle affected by naturally acquired respiratory tract disease

Jeffrey N. Carter Department of Animal Science, College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.
Present address is Ralston Purina Company, Checkerboard Sq, 2RN, St Louis, MO 63164.

Search for other papers by Jeffrey N. Carter in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD
,
Glacia L. Meredith Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.

Search for other papers by Glacia L. Meredith in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 MS
,
Marie Montelongo Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.

Search for other papers by Marie Montelongo in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 BS
,
Donald R. Gill Department of Animal Science, College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.

Search for other papers by Donald R. Gill in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD
,
Clinton R. Krehbiel Department of Animal Science, College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.

Search for other papers by Clinton R. Krehbiel in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD
,
Mark E. Payton Department of Statistics, College of Arts and Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.

Search for other papers by Mark E. Payton in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD
, and
Anthony W. Confer Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.

Search for other papers by Anthony W. Confer in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Abstract

Objective—To correlate serum concentrations of fibrinogen (Fib), haptoglobin (Hap), serum amyloid-A (SAA), and α-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP) with clinical respiratory tract disease and response to treatment in transport-stressed feedlot cattle fed vitamin E-supplemented diets.

Animals—387 heifer calves (mean initial weight, 197 kg).

Procedure—Calves purchased from an order buyer were delivered to a feedlot to study the effects of dietary supplementation with 2,000 IU of vitamin E for 0, 7, 14, or 28 days after arrival. Serum or plasma Fib, Hap, SAA, and AGP concentrations were measured on days 0, 7, and 28 after arrival as well as at the time of treatment for respiratory tract disease with antimicrobial drugs and after completion of treatment.

Results—Vitamin E supplementation was associated with decreased treatment costs. In cattle that were not recognized as sick or responded positively to 1 antimicrobial treatment, serum Hap concentrations were significantly lower on days 0 and 7 than concentrations for cattle that required > 1 treatment. Serum Hap concentrations and ratios of Hap to SAA on day 0 significantly correlated with the number of antimicrobial treatments required. Serum Hap concentrations at the time of initial treatment were significantly lower for cattle that required only 1 treatment, compared with those that required > 1 treatment.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Serum Hap concentrations are of potential value for use in assessing feedlot cattle that may become ill as a result of respiratory tract disease and for use in monitoring treatment efficacy. (Am J Vet Res 2002; 63:1111–1117)

Abstract

Objective—To correlate serum concentrations of fibrinogen (Fib), haptoglobin (Hap), serum amyloid-A (SAA), and α-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP) with clinical respiratory tract disease and response to treatment in transport-stressed feedlot cattle fed vitamin E-supplemented diets.

Animals—387 heifer calves (mean initial weight, 197 kg).

Procedure—Calves purchased from an order buyer were delivered to a feedlot to study the effects of dietary supplementation with 2,000 IU of vitamin E for 0, 7, 14, or 28 days after arrival. Serum or plasma Fib, Hap, SAA, and AGP concentrations were measured on days 0, 7, and 28 after arrival as well as at the time of treatment for respiratory tract disease with antimicrobial drugs and after completion of treatment.

Results—Vitamin E supplementation was associated with decreased treatment costs. In cattle that were not recognized as sick or responded positively to 1 antimicrobial treatment, serum Hap concentrations were significantly lower on days 0 and 7 than concentrations for cattle that required > 1 treatment. Serum Hap concentrations and ratios of Hap to SAA on day 0 significantly correlated with the number of antimicrobial treatments required. Serum Hap concentrations at the time of initial treatment were significantly lower for cattle that required only 1 treatment, compared with those that required > 1 treatment.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Serum Hap concentrations are of potential value for use in assessing feedlot cattle that may become ill as a result of respiratory tract disease and for use in monitoring treatment efficacy. (Am J Vet Res 2002; 63:1111–1117)

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 78 0 0
Full Text Views 381 184 37
PDF Downloads 156 65 4
Advertisement