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Kinetics of mRNA expression of alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes in hepatic tissues from glucocorticoid-treated dogs

Charles E. Wiedmeyer DVM, PhD1,2, Philip F. Solter DVM, PhD3, and Walter E. Hoffmann PhD,DVM4
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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.
  • | 2 Present address is Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.
  • | 4 Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.

Abstract

Objective—To clone segments of the canine liver alkaline phosphatase (LALP) and corticosteroidinduced alkaline phosphatase (CIALP) genes and use those clones to determine the tissue source of CIALP, the kinetics of LALP and CIALP mRNA expression for glucocorticoid-treated dogs, and the correlation between LALP and CIALP transcript concentrations and isoenzyme activities.

Sample Population—Tissues obtained from 7 dogs treated with prednisone (1 mg/kg, SC, q 24 h) for up to 32 days and 1 untreated (control) dog.

Procedure—Gene segments of LALP and CIALP were obtained by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. The tissue source of CIALP and IALP mRNA was determined by northern blot analysis of tissues from 1 of the glucocorticoidtreated dogs. Hepatic tissues and serum samples were obtained from the 6 remaining glucocorticoidtreated dogs on days 0, 2, 5, 10, and 32 of prednisone treatment, and relative expression of LALP and CIALP mRNA was correlated with LALP and CIALP activity.

Results—A 2,246-base pair (bp) segment of canine LALP and a 1,338-bp segment of CIALP were cloned. Northern blot analysis revealed CIALP mRNA expression in hepatic tissues only after glucocorticoid treatment. Kinetics of LALP and CIALP mRNA expression in the liver of glucocorticoid-treated dogs paralleled liver and serum activities of LALP and CIALP.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The liver is the most likely source for CIALP in dogs. Analysis of kinetics of serum and hepatic LALP and CIALP mRNA suggests that after glucocorticoid treatment, both are regulated by modification of mRNA transcript concentrations, possibly through differing mechanisms. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:1089–1095)

Abstract

Objective—To clone segments of the canine liver alkaline phosphatase (LALP) and corticosteroidinduced alkaline phosphatase (CIALP) genes and use those clones to determine the tissue source of CIALP, the kinetics of LALP and CIALP mRNA expression for glucocorticoid-treated dogs, and the correlation between LALP and CIALP transcript concentrations and isoenzyme activities.

Sample Population—Tissues obtained from 7 dogs treated with prednisone (1 mg/kg, SC, q 24 h) for up to 32 days and 1 untreated (control) dog.

Procedure—Gene segments of LALP and CIALP were obtained by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. The tissue source of CIALP and IALP mRNA was determined by northern blot analysis of tissues from 1 of the glucocorticoidtreated dogs. Hepatic tissues and serum samples were obtained from the 6 remaining glucocorticoidtreated dogs on days 0, 2, 5, 10, and 32 of prednisone treatment, and relative expression of LALP and CIALP mRNA was correlated with LALP and CIALP activity.

Results—A 2,246-base pair (bp) segment of canine LALP and a 1,338-bp segment of CIALP were cloned. Northern blot analysis revealed CIALP mRNA expression in hepatic tissues only after glucocorticoid treatment. Kinetics of LALP and CIALP mRNA expression in the liver of glucocorticoid-treated dogs paralleled liver and serum activities of LALP and CIALP.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The liver is the most likely source for CIALP in dogs. Analysis of kinetics of serum and hepatic LALP and CIALP mRNA suggests that after glucocorticoid treatment, both are regulated by modification of mRNA transcript concentrations, possibly through differing mechanisms. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:1089–1095)