Advertisement

Effect of withholding feed on concentration and composition of plasma very low density lipoprotein and serum nonesterified fatty acids in horses

Nicholas FrankDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1248.
present adress is Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-4545.

Search for other papers by Nicholas Frank in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
,
Janice E. SojkaDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1248.

Search for other papers by Janice E. Sojka in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 VMD, MS
, and
Mickey A. LatourAnimal Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1248.

Search for other papers by Mickey A. Latour in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD

Abstract

Objective—To measure and compare the concentration and composition of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) in plasma and selected lipids in serum of horses fed mixed grass hay ad libitum or denied feed for 36 hours.

Animals—4 healthy adult mares.

Procedure—Mares were either fed mixed grass hay ad libitum or denied feed for 36 hours beginning at 8:00 AM. Blood samples were collected every 2 hours during the study period and analyzed for nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA), triglyceride (TG), VLDL, and glucose concentrations and composition of VLDL.

Results—Withholding feed significantly increased mean serum concentrations of NEFA. By 36 hours, a 16-fold increase in mean serum NEFA concentration and 2-fold increase in mean plasma VLDL concentration, compared with baseline values, were detected. Mean plasma TG concentrations significantly increased with time in feed-deprived horses. Significantly lower overall mean plasma glucose concentrations were detected in feed-deprived horses. Mean percentage of protein in VLDL was significantly lower in feed-deprived horses. Plasma VLDL concentrations varied widely among horses in response to withholding feed. Plasma TG and VLDL concentrations remained unaltered in 2 horses.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Withholding feed significantly increases blood lipid concentrations in horses, but individual horses respond differently. Serum NEFA concentrations were increased in all 4 horses denied feed, indicating mobilization of tissue triglyceride stores. Variation in plasma VLDL concentration in response to withholding feed suggests that its metabolism is strongly influenced by other, as yet undetermined, factors in horses. Differences in the plasma VLDL concentrations among horses in response to withholding feed may be used as an indication of susceptibility to the hyperlipemic syndrome of Equidae. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:1018–1021)

Abstract

Objective—To measure and compare the concentration and composition of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) in plasma and selected lipids in serum of horses fed mixed grass hay ad libitum or denied feed for 36 hours.

Animals—4 healthy adult mares.

Procedure—Mares were either fed mixed grass hay ad libitum or denied feed for 36 hours beginning at 8:00 AM. Blood samples were collected every 2 hours during the study period and analyzed for nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA), triglyceride (TG), VLDL, and glucose concentrations and composition of VLDL.

Results—Withholding feed significantly increased mean serum concentrations of NEFA. By 36 hours, a 16-fold increase in mean serum NEFA concentration and 2-fold increase in mean plasma VLDL concentration, compared with baseline values, were detected. Mean plasma TG concentrations significantly increased with time in feed-deprived horses. Significantly lower overall mean plasma glucose concentrations were detected in feed-deprived horses. Mean percentage of protein in VLDL was significantly lower in feed-deprived horses. Plasma VLDL concentrations varied widely among horses in response to withholding feed. Plasma TG and VLDL concentrations remained unaltered in 2 horses.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Withholding feed significantly increases blood lipid concentrations in horses, but individual horses respond differently. Serum NEFA concentrations were increased in all 4 horses denied feed, indicating mobilization of tissue triglyceride stores. Variation in plasma VLDL concentration in response to withholding feed suggests that its metabolism is strongly influenced by other, as yet undetermined, factors in horses. Differences in the plasma VLDL concentrations among horses in response to withholding feed may be used as an indication of susceptibility to the hyperlipemic syndrome of Equidae. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:1018–1021)