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Effect of seminal plasma concentration and various extenders on postthaw motility and glass wool-Sephadex filtration of cryopreserved stallion semen

Abdorrahman S. Alghamdi DVM, MS1, Mats H. T. Troedsson DVM, PhD2, Jay L. Xue DVM, PhD3,4, and Bo G. Crabo DVM, PhD5,6
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  • 1 Department of Clinical and Population Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical and Population Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108.
  • | 3 Department of Clinical and Population Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108.
  • | 4 Department of Medicine, Medical School, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55414.
  • | 5 Department of Animal Sciences, College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences, University of Minnesota, St Paul, MN 55108.
  • | 6 PO Box 4105, Cave Creek, AZ 85327-4105.

Abstract

Objective—To compare the effect of semen extender and seminal plasma on postthaw motility and filtration through a glass wool-Sephadex (GWS) filter for frozen stallion semen.

Sample Population—7 stallions from which we collected ≥ 3 ejaculates/stallion.

Procedure—4 experiments were conducted to evaluate postthaw quality of frozen stallion semen. Kenney extender was compared with glucose-EDTA extender by use of various dilution rates that resulted in differing concentrations of seminal plasma. Stallions known to produce semen with poor postthaw quality were used to investigate whether a particular extender or dilution rate could improve ability of such semen to survive freeze-thaw procedures.

Results—Use of Kenney extender as the centrifugation extender significantly improved postthaw motility and GWS filtration, compared with glucose-EDTA. Extending semen at a dilution of 1:3 was significantly better than 1:1 for both motility and GWS filtration. In addition, including seminal plasma at a concentration of 5% in the cryopreserved semen resulted in significantly higher yield of spermatozoa after GWS filtration, compared with complete removal of SP or use of seminal plasma at 25%. Lastly, semen with poor postthaw quality had significantly improved postthaw quality in regard to motility and GWS filtration when semen was frozen with seminal plasma at a concentration of 5%, compared with semen frozen with seminal plasma at a concentration of 25%.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Use of Kenney extender at a high dilution (≥ 1:3) immediately after collection of semen can improve postthaw quality of frozen stallion semen. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:880–885)

Abstract

Objective—To compare the effect of semen extender and seminal plasma on postthaw motility and filtration through a glass wool-Sephadex (GWS) filter for frozen stallion semen.

Sample Population—7 stallions from which we collected ≥ 3 ejaculates/stallion.

Procedure—4 experiments were conducted to evaluate postthaw quality of frozen stallion semen. Kenney extender was compared with glucose-EDTA extender by use of various dilution rates that resulted in differing concentrations of seminal plasma. Stallions known to produce semen with poor postthaw quality were used to investigate whether a particular extender or dilution rate could improve ability of such semen to survive freeze-thaw procedures.

Results—Use of Kenney extender as the centrifugation extender significantly improved postthaw motility and GWS filtration, compared with glucose-EDTA. Extending semen at a dilution of 1:3 was significantly better than 1:1 for both motility and GWS filtration. In addition, including seminal plasma at a concentration of 5% in the cryopreserved semen resulted in significantly higher yield of spermatozoa after GWS filtration, compared with complete removal of SP or use of seminal plasma at 25%. Lastly, semen with poor postthaw quality had significantly improved postthaw quality in regard to motility and GWS filtration when semen was frozen with seminal plasma at a concentration of 5%, compared with semen frozen with seminal plasma at a concentration of 25%.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Use of Kenney extender at a high dilution (≥ 1:3) immediately after collection of semen can improve postthaw quality of frozen stallion semen. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:880–885)