Laser flaremetric evaluation of experimentally induced blood-aqueous barrier disruption in cats

Amy J. RankinDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1248.

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Sheryl G. KrohneDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1248.

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Nita W. GlickmanDepartment of Veterinary Pathobiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1248.

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Larry T. GlickmanDepartment of Veterinary Pathobiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1248.

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Jean StilesDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1248.

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Abstract

Objectives—To determine whether aqueous humor flare, measured by use of laser flaremetry, was proportional to aqueous humor protein concentration and to use laser flaremetry to evaluate disruption of the blood-aqueous barrier (BAB) in cats.

Animals—30 healthy adult cats.

Procedure—Laser flaremetry values for all eyes were compared with aqueous humor protein concentrations determined by use of a Coomassie blue microprotein assay. Laser flaremetry was then performed on both eyes before (0 hours) and 4, 8, and 26 hours after initiation of topical application of 2% pilocarpine (q 8 h) to 1 eye of 9 cats or paracentesis of the anterior chamber of 1 eye of 8 cats. Intraocular pressure and pupil size were also determined. Aqueous humor protein concentration was extrapolated from flare values by use of linear regression.

Results—There was a linear relationship between flare values and aqueous humor protein concentrations. Topical application of 2% pilocarpine and paracentesis of the anterior chamber caused a breakdown of the BAB that was detected by use of laser flaremetry. The highest mean flare readings after application of pilocarpine or paracentesis were 24.4 and 132.8 pc/ms, respectively, which corresponded to aqueous humor protein concentrations of 85.5 and 434.9 mg/dl, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Paracentesis of the anterior chamber resulted in a more severe breakdown of the BAB in cats than topical application of 2% pilocarpine. Laser flaremetry may be a useful clinical method to detect increases in aqueous flare and, hence, disruptions of the BAB in cats. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:750–756)

Abstract

Objectives—To determine whether aqueous humor flare, measured by use of laser flaremetry, was proportional to aqueous humor protein concentration and to use laser flaremetry to evaluate disruption of the blood-aqueous barrier (BAB) in cats.

Animals—30 healthy adult cats.

Procedure—Laser flaremetry values for all eyes were compared with aqueous humor protein concentrations determined by use of a Coomassie blue microprotein assay. Laser flaremetry was then performed on both eyes before (0 hours) and 4, 8, and 26 hours after initiation of topical application of 2% pilocarpine (q 8 h) to 1 eye of 9 cats or paracentesis of the anterior chamber of 1 eye of 8 cats. Intraocular pressure and pupil size were also determined. Aqueous humor protein concentration was extrapolated from flare values by use of linear regression.

Results—There was a linear relationship between flare values and aqueous humor protein concentrations. Topical application of 2% pilocarpine and paracentesis of the anterior chamber caused a breakdown of the BAB that was detected by use of laser flaremetry. The highest mean flare readings after application of pilocarpine or paracentesis were 24.4 and 132.8 pc/ms, respectively, which corresponded to aqueous humor protein concentrations of 85.5 and 434.9 mg/dl, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Paracentesis of the anterior chamber resulted in a more severe breakdown of the BAB in cats than topical application of 2% pilocarpine. Laser flaremetry may be a useful clinical method to detect increases in aqueous flare and, hence, disruptions of the BAB in cats. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:750–756)

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