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Plasma concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α in cats with congestive heart failure

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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery and the Michael E. DeBakey Institute, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
  • | 3 Present address is Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
  • | 4 Department of Medicine, The Animal Medical Center, 510 E 62nd St, New York, NY 10021.
  • | 5 Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery and the Michael E. DeBakey Institute, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.
  • | 6 Section of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Baylor University, Houston, TX 77030.
  • | 7 Veterans' Administration Puget Sound Health Care System, 1660 S Columbian Way, Campus Box 358280, Seattle, WA 98108.
  • | 8 Present address is Veterans’ Administration Puget Sound Health Care System, 1660 S Columbian Way, Campus Box 358280, Seattle, WA 98108.
  • | 9 Section of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Baylor University, Houston, TX 77030.

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether plasma concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) are increased in cats with congestive heart failure (CHF) secondary to cardiomyopathy.

Animals—26 adult cats with CHF and cardiomyopathy and 9 healthy control cats.

Procedure—Plasma concentrations of TNF-α were measured in cats with CHF and cardiomyopathy. Tumor necrosis factor-α was measured by quantifying cytotoxic effects of TNF-α on L929 murine fibrosarcoma cells.

Results—Concentrations of TNF-α were increased (0.13 to 3.6 U/ml) in 10 of 26 cats with CHF but were undetectable in the other 16 cats with CHF and all control cats. In 20 of 26 cats with CHF, right-sided heart failure (RHF) was evident; TNF-α concentrations were increased in 9 of these 20 cats. The remaining 6 cats had left-sided heart failure (LHF); TNF-α concentrations were increased in only 1 of these cats. Age of cats with LHF (mean ± SD, 12.1 ± 6.2 years) was not significantly different from age of the cohort with RHF (10.5 ± 5.2 years). Body weight of cats with increased TNFα concentrations (5.4 ± 1.8 kg) was not significantly different from body weight of cats with CHF that did not have measurable concentrations of TNF-α (4.7 ± 1.6 kg).

Conclusionss and Clinical Relevance—Concentrations of TNF-α were increased in many cats with CHF. Cats with RHF were most likely to have increased TNF-α concentrations. Increased plasma concentrations of TNF-α in cats with CHF may offer insights into the pathophysiologic mechanisms of heart failure and provide targets for therapeutic interventions. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:640–642)

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether plasma concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) are increased in cats with congestive heart failure (CHF) secondary to cardiomyopathy.

Animals—26 adult cats with CHF and cardiomyopathy and 9 healthy control cats.

Procedure—Plasma concentrations of TNF-α were measured in cats with CHF and cardiomyopathy. Tumor necrosis factor-α was measured by quantifying cytotoxic effects of TNF-α on L929 murine fibrosarcoma cells.

Results—Concentrations of TNF-α were increased (0.13 to 3.6 U/ml) in 10 of 26 cats with CHF but were undetectable in the other 16 cats with CHF and all control cats. In 20 of 26 cats with CHF, right-sided heart failure (RHF) was evident; TNF-α concentrations were increased in 9 of these 20 cats. The remaining 6 cats had left-sided heart failure (LHF); TNF-α concentrations were increased in only 1 of these cats. Age of cats with LHF (mean ± SD, 12.1 ± 6.2 years) was not significantly different from age of the cohort with RHF (10.5 ± 5.2 years). Body weight of cats with increased TNFα concentrations (5.4 ± 1.8 kg) was not significantly different from body weight of cats with CHF that did not have measurable concentrations of TNF-α (4.7 ± 1.6 kg).

Conclusionss and Clinical Relevance—Concentrations of TNF-α were increased in many cats with CHF. Cats with RHF were most likely to have increased TNF-α concentrations. Increased plasma concentrations of TNF-α in cats with CHF may offer insights into the pathophysiologic mechanisms of heart failure and provide targets for therapeutic interventions. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:640–642)