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Evaluation of acetaminophen absorption in horses with experimentally induced delayed gastric emptying

Katharina L. LohmannDepartment of Large Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4475.
Present address is Department of Large Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

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Anne BahrDepartment of Large Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4475.

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Noah D. CohenDepartment of Large Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4475.

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Dawn M. BootheDepartment of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4475.

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Allen J. RousselDepartment of Large Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4475.

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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the correlation between the half-time of liquid-phase gastric emptying (T50) determined by use of nuclear scintigraphy, using technetium Tc 99m pentetate, and absorption variables of orally administered acetaminophen in horses with experimentally delayed gastric emptying.

Animals—6 mature horses.

Procedure—Delayed gastric emptying was induced by IV injection of atropine sulfate. Twenty minutes later, acetaminophen and technetium Tc 99m pentetate were administered simultaneously via nasogastric tube. Serial lateral images of the stomach region were obtained, using a gamma camera. Power exponential curves were used for estimation of T50 and modified R2 values for estimation of goodness-of-fit of the data. Serial serum samples were obtained, and acetaminophen concentration was determined, using fluorescence polarization immunoassay. Maximum serum concentration (Cmax), time to reach maximum serum concentration (Tmax), area under the curve for 480 minutes, and the appearance rate constant were determined, using a parameter estimation program. Correlations were calculated, using a Spearman rank correlation coefficient.

Results—A significant correlation was detected between T50 determined by use of scintigraphy and Tmax determined by use of acetaminophen absorption. Correlation between T50 and other absorption variables of acetaminophen was not significant.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The acetaminophen absorption method was a valid technique in this model of delayed gastric emptying in horses. The method may be a valuable tool for use in research as well as in clinical evaluation of gastric emptying in horses. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:170–174)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the correlation between the half-time of liquid-phase gastric emptying (T50) determined by use of nuclear scintigraphy, using technetium Tc 99m pentetate, and absorption variables of orally administered acetaminophen in horses with experimentally delayed gastric emptying.

Animals—6 mature horses.

Procedure—Delayed gastric emptying was induced by IV injection of atropine sulfate. Twenty minutes later, acetaminophen and technetium Tc 99m pentetate were administered simultaneously via nasogastric tube. Serial lateral images of the stomach region were obtained, using a gamma camera. Power exponential curves were used for estimation of T50 and modified R2 values for estimation of goodness-of-fit of the data. Serial serum samples were obtained, and acetaminophen concentration was determined, using fluorescence polarization immunoassay. Maximum serum concentration (Cmax), time to reach maximum serum concentration (Tmax), area under the curve for 480 minutes, and the appearance rate constant were determined, using a parameter estimation program. Correlations were calculated, using a Spearman rank correlation coefficient.

Results—A significant correlation was detected between T50 determined by use of scintigraphy and Tmax determined by use of acetaminophen absorption. Correlation between T50 and other absorption variables of acetaminophen was not significant.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The acetaminophen absorption method was a valid technique in this model of delayed gastric emptying in horses. The method may be a valuable tool for use in research as well as in clinical evaluation of gastric emptying in horses. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:170–174)