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Nucleotide sequence of the canine αIIb gene from platelet-derived cDNA

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  • 1 Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849.
  • | 2 Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849.
  • | 3 Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849.

Abstract

Objective—To determine the nucleotide sequence of the αIIb gene from canine platelet-derived cDNA.

Animals—3 adult dogs.

Procedure—First-strand cDNA was prepared from total RNA isolated from canine platelets. The cDNA was amplified, using specific primers in polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the nucleotide sequence was obtained from purified PCR products.

Results—Except for the nucleotide at position 694, results of all sequencing reactions of αIIb were identical for canine platelet-derived cDNA. Canine αIIb had 3 fewer codons than αIIb of humans. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of full-length canine αIIb shared ≥ 83% similarity with the sequences established for humans. Segments of canine αIIb nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences were ≥ 78% similar to αIIb associated with 7 functional domains (extracellular, transmembrane, cytoplasmic, and 4 calcium-binding domains) in humans, with the highest degree of similarity correlating with the sequences of the 4 calcium-binding domains. Amino acid residues associated with development of alloantibodies in humans (Met837, Val837, Ile843, Ser843) are not encoded by canine αIIb.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The nucleotide variation at position 694 of canine αIIb may represent a polymorphism. The species differences in the αIIb sequence may contribute to variations in receptor-li gand interactions. The high degree of αIIb sequence conservation of the 4 calcium-binding domains implies functional importance. Some disorders associated with αIIbβ3 in dogs are clinically analogous to diseases in humans, and results indicate that dogs are an appropriate model for the evaluation of gene therapy and other treatments of platelet-associated disorders. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1486–1492)

Abstract

Objective—To determine the nucleotide sequence of the αIIb gene from canine platelet-derived cDNA.

Animals—3 adult dogs.

Procedure—First-strand cDNA was prepared from total RNA isolated from canine platelets. The cDNA was amplified, using specific primers in polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the nucleotide sequence was obtained from purified PCR products.

Results—Except for the nucleotide at position 694, results of all sequencing reactions of αIIb were identical for canine platelet-derived cDNA. Canine αIIb had 3 fewer codons than αIIb of humans. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of full-length canine αIIb shared ≥ 83% similarity with the sequences established for humans. Segments of canine αIIb nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences were ≥ 78% similar to αIIb associated with 7 functional domains (extracellular, transmembrane, cytoplasmic, and 4 calcium-binding domains) in humans, with the highest degree of similarity correlating with the sequences of the 4 calcium-binding domains. Amino acid residues associated with development of alloantibodies in humans (Met837, Val837, Ile843, Ser843) are not encoded by canine αIIb.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The nucleotide variation at position 694 of canine αIIb may represent a polymorphism. The species differences in the αIIb sequence may contribute to variations in receptor-li gand interactions. The high degree of αIIb sequence conservation of the 4 calcium-binding domains implies functional importance. Some disorders associated with αIIbβ3 in dogs are clinically analogous to diseases in humans, and results indicate that dogs are an appropriate model for the evaluation of gene therapy and other treatments of platelet-associated disorders. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1486–1492)