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Correlation of QT dispersion with indices used to evaluate the severity of familial ventricular arrhythmias in Boxers

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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
  • | 4 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
  • | 5 Present address is MedVet Veterinary Specialists, Columbus, OH.
  • | 6 Departments of Veterinary Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

Abstract

Objective—To measure QT interval duration and QT dispersion in Boxers and to determine whether QT variables correlate with indices of disease severity in Boxers with familial ventricular arrhythmias, including the number of ventricular premature complexes per day, arrhythmia grade, and fractional shortening.

Animals—25 Boxers were evaluated by ECG and echocardiography.

Procedure—The QT interval duration was measured from 12-lead ECG and corrected for heart rate (QTc), using Fridericia's formula. The QT and QTc were calculated for each lead, from which QT and QTc dispersion were determined. Echocardiography and 24-hour ambulatory ECG were performed to evaluate for familial ventricular arrhythmias. Total number of ventricular premature complexes, arrhythmia grade, and fractional shortening were determined and used as indices of disease severity.

Results—There was no correlation between any QT variable and total number of ventricular premature complexes, arrhythmia grade, or fractional shortening. No difference between QT dispersion and QTc dispersion was identified, and correction for heart rate did not affect the results.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—QT interval duration and dispersion did not correlate with indices of disease severity for familial ventricular arrhythmias. Heart rate correction of the QT interval did not appear to be necessary for QT dispersion calculation in this group of dogs. QT dispersion does not appear to be a useful noninvasive diagnostic tool in the evaluation of familial ventricular arrhythmias of Boxers. Identification of affected individuals at risk for sudden death remains a challenge in the management of this disease. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1481–1485)

Abstract

Objective—To measure QT interval duration and QT dispersion in Boxers and to determine whether QT variables correlate with indices of disease severity in Boxers with familial ventricular arrhythmias, including the number of ventricular premature complexes per day, arrhythmia grade, and fractional shortening.

Animals—25 Boxers were evaluated by ECG and echocardiography.

Procedure—The QT interval duration was measured from 12-lead ECG and corrected for heart rate (QTc), using Fridericia's formula. The QT and QTc were calculated for each lead, from which QT and QTc dispersion were determined. Echocardiography and 24-hour ambulatory ECG were performed to evaluate for familial ventricular arrhythmias. Total number of ventricular premature complexes, arrhythmia grade, and fractional shortening were determined and used as indices of disease severity.

Results—There was no correlation between any QT variable and total number of ventricular premature complexes, arrhythmia grade, or fractional shortening. No difference between QT dispersion and QTc dispersion was identified, and correction for heart rate did not affect the results.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—QT interval duration and dispersion did not correlate with indices of disease severity for familial ventricular arrhythmias. Heart rate correction of the QT interval did not appear to be necessary for QT dispersion calculation in this group of dogs. QT dispersion does not appear to be a useful noninvasive diagnostic tool in the evaluation of familial ventricular arrhythmias of Boxers. Identification of affected individuals at risk for sudden death remains a challenge in the management of this disease. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1481–1485)