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Telomerase activity in clinically normal dogs and dogs with malignant lymphoma

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  • 1 Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada, N1G 2W1.
  • | 2 Present address is Centre Vétérinaire DMV, Montréal, QC, Canada, H4T 1A1.
  • | 3 Department of Clinical Studies, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada, N1G 2W1.
  • | 4 Department of Biomedical Sciences, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada, N1G 2W1.
  • | 5 Department of Biomedical Sciences, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada, N1G 2W1.

Abstract

Objectives—To determine whether telomerase activity was present in lymph nodes, buffy coat, and serum samples from dogs with malignant lymphoma (ML) and in liver, lymph node, buffy coat, and serum samples from clinically normal dogs

Sample Population—Tissue specimens and blood samples were obtained from 11 clinically normal adult dogs (age range, 1 to 4 years) and 14 client-owned dogs with ML.

Procedure—The telomere repeat amplification protocol assay was used to quantify telomerase activity in the tissues from clinically normal dogs and dogs with ML.

Results—Of 11 clinically normal dogs, 8 had lymph node samples, 5 had liver samples, and 1 had buffy coat samples with detectable telomerase activity. None of the serum samples from the clinically normal dogs had detectable telomerase activity. Of 14 dogs with ML, 9 had lymph node samples, 3 had buffy coat samples, and 1 had serum samples with measurable telomerase activity.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Telomerase activity was not specific to tumor cells and overlapped with that found in cells from clinically normal dogs. Telomerase activity in neoplastic lymph nodes was not substantially different from that found in lymph nodes from clinically normal dogs. The determination of telomerase activity cannot be used as a sole diagnostic test for cancer. Therapeutic modalities directed toward the telomerase enzyme may not be feasible in dogs, because somatic tissues from clinically normal dogs possess variable amounts of telomerase activity. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1442–1446)

Abstract

Objectives—To determine whether telomerase activity was present in lymph nodes, buffy coat, and serum samples from dogs with malignant lymphoma (ML) and in liver, lymph node, buffy coat, and serum samples from clinically normal dogs

Sample Population—Tissue specimens and blood samples were obtained from 11 clinically normal adult dogs (age range, 1 to 4 years) and 14 client-owned dogs with ML.

Procedure—The telomere repeat amplification protocol assay was used to quantify telomerase activity in the tissues from clinically normal dogs and dogs with ML.

Results—Of 11 clinically normal dogs, 8 had lymph node samples, 5 had liver samples, and 1 had buffy coat samples with detectable telomerase activity. None of the serum samples from the clinically normal dogs had detectable telomerase activity. Of 14 dogs with ML, 9 had lymph node samples, 3 had buffy coat samples, and 1 had serum samples with measurable telomerase activity.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Telomerase activity was not specific to tumor cells and overlapped with that found in cells from clinically normal dogs. Telomerase activity in neoplastic lymph nodes was not substantially different from that found in lymph nodes from clinically normal dogs. The determination of telomerase activity cannot be used as a sole diagnostic test for cancer. Therapeutic modalities directed toward the telomerase enzyme may not be feasible in dogs, because somatic tissues from clinically normal dogs possess variable amounts of telomerase activity. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1442–1446)