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Characterization of house dust mite and scabiesmite allergens by use of canine serum antibodies

R. Jeffrey SchumannDepartment of Biological Sciences, Wright State University, Dayton, OH 45435.

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Marjorie S. MorganDepartment of Biological Sciences, Wright State University, Dayton, OH 45435.

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Robert GlassDepartment of Biomedical Services, 3921 Steck Ave No. A101, Austin, TX 78759.

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Larry G. ArlianDepartment of Biological Sciences, Wright State University, Dayton, OH 45435.

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Abstract

Objective—To identify the major allergenic proteins from the 3 main species of dust mites to which dogs react (Dermatophagoides farinae, D pteronyssinus,and Euroglyphus maynei) and evaluate the potential crossreactivity of dust mite allergens with antigens from the ectoparasitic mite Sarcoptes scabiei var canis.

Sample Population—Sera from 83 dogs with atopic dermatitis.

Procedure—Sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting using serum from atopic dogs was used to identify IgE-binding proteins in extracts of the 4 mite species.

Results—Sera of atopic dogs contained IgE against 23, 17, 25, and 17 allergens from D farinae, D pteronyssinus, E maynei,and S scabiei, respectively. Unlike the situation for humans, the major allergens for dogs are mostly proteins that are larger than 90 kd molecular weight. Dermatophagoides farinae and E maynei appear to be more allergenic for dogs than is D pteronyssinus. Some dogs with serum IgE against dust mites also had IgE against antigens of S scabiei var canis.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Multiple dust mite allergens induce an IgE response in dogs. These allergens are mostly greater than 90 kd molecular weight. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1344–1348)

Abstract

Objective—To identify the major allergenic proteins from the 3 main species of dust mites to which dogs react (Dermatophagoides farinae, D pteronyssinus,and Euroglyphus maynei) and evaluate the potential crossreactivity of dust mite allergens with antigens from the ectoparasitic mite Sarcoptes scabiei var canis.

Sample Population—Sera from 83 dogs with atopic dermatitis.

Procedure—Sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting using serum from atopic dogs was used to identify IgE-binding proteins in extracts of the 4 mite species.

Results—Sera of atopic dogs contained IgE against 23, 17, 25, and 17 allergens from D farinae, D pteronyssinus, E maynei,and S scabiei, respectively. Unlike the situation for humans, the major allergens for dogs are mostly proteins that are larger than 90 kd molecular weight. Dermatophagoides farinae and E maynei appear to be more allergenic for dogs than is D pteronyssinus. Some dogs with serum IgE against dust mites also had IgE against antigens of S scabiei var canis.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Multiple dust mite allergens induce an IgE response in dogs. These allergens are mostly greater than 90 kd molecular weight. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1344–1348)