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Use of dual energy x-ray absorptiometry for noninvasive body composition measurements in clinically normal dogs

Susan D. LautenScott-Ritchey Research Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849.

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Nancy R. CoxScott-Ritchey Research Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849.

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William R. Brawner JrDepartment of Radiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849.

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Henry J. BakerScott-Ritchey Research Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, AL 36849.

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Abstract

Objective—To determine quantitative values for components of body composition in clinically normal dogs of various breeds by use of dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) and validate the precision and accuracy of DEXA technology in dogs.

Animals—103 clinically normal sexually intact adult dogs.

Procedure—In a cross-sectional study, Beagles, Pembroke Welsh Corgis, Golden Retrievers, Great Danes, Pointers, Rottweilers, and nonpurebred dogs received total body DEXA scans. For the validation portion of the study, the results of DEXA scans of 6 dogs were compared with values obtained by chemical analyses of tissues from euthanatized dogs to determine the accuracy of this modality in dogs.

Results—Results (coefficient of variation) of the precision tests ranged from 0.10% for lean tissue to 5.19% for fat tissue, whereas accuracy tests revealed a difference between percentage bone mineral content and ash values. Body composition differed by sex, such as higher lean tissue and bone mineral content in males within some breeds, and among breeds. Regardless of body size or weight, the percentage of body weight that was bone mineral ranged from 3 to 4.0%.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of this cross-sectional study provide valuable body composition data for clinically normal adult dogs, which may have research and clinical applications. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1295–1301)

Abstract

Objective—To determine quantitative values for components of body composition in clinically normal dogs of various breeds by use of dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) and validate the precision and accuracy of DEXA technology in dogs.

Animals—103 clinically normal sexually intact adult dogs.

Procedure—In a cross-sectional study, Beagles, Pembroke Welsh Corgis, Golden Retrievers, Great Danes, Pointers, Rottweilers, and nonpurebred dogs received total body DEXA scans. For the validation portion of the study, the results of DEXA scans of 6 dogs were compared with values obtained by chemical analyses of tissues from euthanatized dogs to determine the accuracy of this modality in dogs.

Results—Results (coefficient of variation) of the precision tests ranged from 0.10% for lean tissue to 5.19% for fat tissue, whereas accuracy tests revealed a difference between percentage bone mineral content and ash values. Body composition differed by sex, such as higher lean tissue and bone mineral content in males within some breeds, and among breeds. Regardless of body size or weight, the percentage of body weight that was bone mineral ranged from 3 to 4.0%.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of this cross-sectional study provide valuable body composition data for clinically normal adult dogs, which may have research and clinical applications. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1295–1301)