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Long-term temporal evaluation of ground reaction forces during development of experimentally induced osteoarthritis in dogs

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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

Abstract

Objective—To describe changes in vertical ground reaction forces (GRF) over 48 months in dogs with osteoarthritis (OA) of the stifle joint induced by transection of a cranial cruciate ligament (CCL).

Animals—12 clinically normal adult dogs.

Procedure—Vertical GRF (eg, peak force and impulse) were determined prior to and 1, 2, 3, 6, 10, and 12 months after transection of the right CCL. In 7 dogs, data were also collected 24, 32, 38, 42, and 48 months after transection.

Results—Vertical peak force and impulse were significantly decreased in the right hind limb at all times after transection, compared with baseline values. From 10 through 48 months after transection, vertical GRF remained essentially static. Ground reaction forces in the unoperated (left) hind limb also changed significantly during the study. Left vertical impulse significantly increased 3 months after transection, whereas at 24, 38, 42, and 48 months after transection, left vertical peak force was significantly decreased, compared with the baseline value .Mean intradog coefficients of variation (CV) for peak vertical force and impulse ranged from 7.38 and 9.32, respectively, 1 month after transection to 1.96 and 2.76, respectively, at 42 months.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Vertical GRF in the affected hind limb equilibrated approximately 10 months after CCL transection. Prior to this, force transmission across the affected stifle joint changed significantly over time. Intradog CV were small, indicating that GRF may be an appropriate outcome measurement for evaluation of OA development induced by CCL transection in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1207–1211)

Abstract

Objective—To describe changes in vertical ground reaction forces (GRF) over 48 months in dogs with osteoarthritis (OA) of the stifle joint induced by transection of a cranial cruciate ligament (CCL).

Animals—12 clinically normal adult dogs.

Procedure—Vertical GRF (eg, peak force and impulse) were determined prior to and 1, 2, 3, 6, 10, and 12 months after transection of the right CCL. In 7 dogs, data were also collected 24, 32, 38, 42, and 48 months after transection.

Results—Vertical peak force and impulse were significantly decreased in the right hind limb at all times after transection, compared with baseline values. From 10 through 48 months after transection, vertical GRF remained essentially static. Ground reaction forces in the unoperated (left) hind limb also changed significantly during the study. Left vertical impulse significantly increased 3 months after transection, whereas at 24, 38, 42, and 48 months after transection, left vertical peak force was significantly decreased, compared with the baseline value .Mean intradog coefficients of variation (CV) for peak vertical force and impulse ranged from 7.38 and 9.32, respectively, 1 month after transection to 1.96 and 2.76, respectively, at 42 months.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Vertical GRF in the affected hind limb equilibrated approximately 10 months after CCL transection. Prior to this, force transmission across the affected stifle joint changed significantly over time. Intradog CV were small, indicating that GRF may be an appropriate outcome measurement for evaluation of OA development induced by CCL transection in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1207–1211)