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Effect of α-tocopheryl acetate supplementation on vitamin E concentrations in Greyhounds before and after a race

Karen C. ScottDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610- 0126.

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Richard C. HillDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610- 0126.

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Daniel D. LewisDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610- 0126.

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Alvin J. Boning JrDepartment of Animal Science, Institute of Food and Agricultural Science, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610- 0126.

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Deborah A. SundstromDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610- 0126.

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Abstract

Objectives—To determine effect of α-tocopherol supplementation on serum vitamin E concentrations in Greyhounds before and after a race.

Animals—8 adult racing Greyhounds.

Procedure—Dogs were given 2 capsules of α-tocopheryl acetate (total, 680 units [0.5 g]) with food that contained ≤ 15 mg of vitamin E/kg each morning for 7 days. Dogs were exercised in a 30 × 30-m grass paddock for 15 minutes twice a day and raced for 500 m twice a week. Blood samples were collected before and 5 minutes after a race, before supplementation was begun, and after 7 days of supplementation. Blood and diet samples were analyzed for tocopherols and α-tocopheryl acetate.

Results—Before supplementation, serum α-tocopherol concentration after racing (mean ± SD, 6.7 ± 2.4 mg/L ) was significantly lower than before racing (12.2 ± 3.1 mg/L). After supplementation, α- tocopherol concentrations were significantly higher overall, although values obtained before (26.6 ± 5.2 mg/L) and after (29.8 ± 3.6 mg/L) racing were not significantly different.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Supplementation with α-tocopheryl acetate increased serum α-tocopherol concentrations and eliminated the decrease in α-tocopherol concentration that was detected after a race, which may decrease oxidation during exercise and improve performance or recovery. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1118–1120)

Abstract

Objectives—To determine effect of α-tocopherol supplementation on serum vitamin E concentrations in Greyhounds before and after a race.

Animals—8 adult racing Greyhounds.

Procedure—Dogs were given 2 capsules of α-tocopheryl acetate (total, 680 units [0.5 g]) with food that contained ≤ 15 mg of vitamin E/kg each morning for 7 days. Dogs were exercised in a 30 × 30-m grass paddock for 15 minutes twice a day and raced for 500 m twice a week. Blood samples were collected before and 5 minutes after a race, before supplementation was begun, and after 7 days of supplementation. Blood and diet samples were analyzed for tocopherols and α-tocopheryl acetate.

Results—Before supplementation, serum α-tocopherol concentration after racing (mean ± SD, 6.7 ± 2.4 mg/L ) was significantly lower than before racing (12.2 ± 3.1 mg/L). After supplementation, α- tocopherol concentrations were significantly higher overall, although values obtained before (26.6 ± 5.2 mg/L) and after (29.8 ± 3.6 mg/L) racing were not significantly different.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Supplementation with α-tocopheryl acetate increased serum α-tocopherol concentrations and eliminated the decrease in α-tocopherol concentration that was detected after a race, which may decrease oxidation during exercise and improve performance or recovery. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1118–1120)