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Effects of enalaprilat on cardiorespiratory, hemodynamic, and hematologic variables in exercising horses

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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210-1089.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210-1089.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210-1089.
  • | 4 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210-1089.
  • | 5 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210-1089.

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of IV administration of enalaprilat on cardiorespiratory and hematologic variables as well as inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity in exercising horses.

Animals—6 adult horses.

Procedure—Horses were trained by running on a treadmill for 5 weeks. Training was continued throughout the study period, and each horse also ran 2 simulated races at 120% of maximum oxygen consumption. Three horses were randomly selected to receive treatment 1 (saline [0.9% NaCl] solution), and the remaining 3 horses received treatment 2 (enalaprilat; 0.5 mg/kg of body weight, IV) before each simulated race. Treatment groups were reversed for the second simulated race. Cardiorespiratory and hematologic data were obtained before, during, and throughout the 1-hour period after each simulated race. Inhibition of ACE activity was determined during and after each race in each horse.

Results—Exercise resulted in significant increases in all hemodynamic variables and respiratory rate. The pH and PO2 of arterial blood decreased during simulated races, whereas PCO2 remained unchanged. Systemic and pulmonary blood pressure measurements and arterial pH, PO2, and PCO2 returned to baseline values by 60 minutes after simulated races. Enalaprilat inhibited ACE activity to < 25% of baseline activity without changing cardiorespiratory or blood gas values, compared with horses administered saline solution.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Enalaprilat administration almost completely inhibited ACE activity in horses without changing the hemodynamic responses to intense exercise and is unlikely to be of value in preventing exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1008–1013)

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of IV administration of enalaprilat on cardiorespiratory and hematologic variables as well as inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity in exercising horses.

Animals—6 adult horses.

Procedure—Horses were trained by running on a treadmill for 5 weeks. Training was continued throughout the study period, and each horse also ran 2 simulated races at 120% of maximum oxygen consumption. Three horses were randomly selected to receive treatment 1 (saline [0.9% NaCl] solution), and the remaining 3 horses received treatment 2 (enalaprilat; 0.5 mg/kg of body weight, IV) before each simulated race. Treatment groups were reversed for the second simulated race. Cardiorespiratory and hematologic data were obtained before, during, and throughout the 1-hour period after each simulated race. Inhibition of ACE activity was determined during and after each race in each horse.

Results—Exercise resulted in significant increases in all hemodynamic variables and respiratory rate. The pH and PO2 of arterial blood decreased during simulated races, whereas PCO2 remained unchanged. Systemic and pulmonary blood pressure measurements and arterial pH, PO2, and PCO2 returned to baseline values by 60 minutes after simulated races. Enalaprilat inhibited ACE activity to < 25% of baseline activity without changing cardiorespiratory or blood gas values, compared with horses administered saline solution.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Enalaprilat administration almost completely inhibited ACE activity in horses without changing the hemodynamic responses to intense exercise and is unlikely to be of value in preventing exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1008–1013)