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Comparison of the radius of curvature of the ulnar trochlear notch of Rottweilers and Greyhounds

Kathleen E. CollinsDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0126.

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Alan R. CrossDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0126.

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Daniel D. LewisDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0126.

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Jorge L. ZapataDepartment of Aerospace Engineering, Mechanics and Engineering Science, the Biomedical Engineering Program, College of Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0126.

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Scott D. GoettDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0126.

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Susan M. NewellDepartment of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0126.

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Andrew J. RapoffDepartment of Aerospace Engineering, Mechanics and Engineering Science, the Biomedical Engineering Program, College of Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0126.

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Abstract

Objective—To compare radius of curvature along the ulnar trochlear notch of Rottweilers and Greyhounds to determine whether morphologic differences exist that may contribute to the cause and pathogenesis of fragmented coronoid process in Rottweilers.

Sample Population—Paired elbow joints from 13 Rottweilers and 14 Greyhounds.

Procedure—Elbow joints were radiographically scored on the basis of severity of osteoarthritic lesions. The articular contour of each ulnar trochlear notch was digitized. The radius of curvature at defined points along the ulnar trochlear notch was compared between breeds.

Results—Radius of curvature of the ulnar trochlear notch was not a constant function of arc length in either breed but had a consistent characteristic appearance in both breeds. Radius of curvature was greatest at each end of the ulnar trochlear notch and had 2 peaks in the midportion of the notch in both breeds. These peaks occurred farther distally in the notch and were larger in Rottweiler ulnae than Greyhound ulnae. A significant difference in mean radius of curvature was detected between breeds at these peaks. Greyhounds had significantly greater mean radius of curvature at the end of the medial coronoid process, compared with Rottweilers.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Radius of curvature of the ulnar trochlear notch is a complex function of arc length in Rottweilers and Greyhounds. The waveform has a consistent characteristic appearance in both breeds. Although significant differences were identified between breeds, associations between these differences and cause or pathogenesis of fragmented coronoid process in Rottweilers were not apparent. ( Am J Vet Res 2001; 62:968–973)

Abstract

Objective—To compare radius of curvature along the ulnar trochlear notch of Rottweilers and Greyhounds to determine whether morphologic differences exist that may contribute to the cause and pathogenesis of fragmented coronoid process in Rottweilers.

Sample Population—Paired elbow joints from 13 Rottweilers and 14 Greyhounds.

Procedure—Elbow joints were radiographically scored on the basis of severity of osteoarthritic lesions. The articular contour of each ulnar trochlear notch was digitized. The radius of curvature at defined points along the ulnar trochlear notch was compared between breeds.

Results—Radius of curvature of the ulnar trochlear notch was not a constant function of arc length in either breed but had a consistent characteristic appearance in both breeds. Radius of curvature was greatest at each end of the ulnar trochlear notch and had 2 peaks in the midportion of the notch in both breeds. These peaks occurred farther distally in the notch and were larger in Rottweiler ulnae than Greyhound ulnae. A significant difference in mean radius of curvature was detected between breeds at these peaks. Greyhounds had significantly greater mean radius of curvature at the end of the medial coronoid process, compared with Rottweilers.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Radius of curvature of the ulnar trochlear notch is a complex function of arc length in Rottweilers and Greyhounds. The waveform has a consistent characteristic appearance in both breeds. Although significant differences were identified between breeds, associations between these differences and cause or pathogenesis of fragmented coronoid process in Rottweilers were not apparent. ( Am J Vet Res 2001; 62:968–973)