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Evaluation of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues from vaccine site-associated sarcomas of cats for polyomavirus DNA and antigen

Beverly A. Kidney DVM, MVetSc1, Deborah M. Haines DVM, PhD2, John A. Ellis DVM, PhD3, Micheline L. Burnham BA4, and Marion L. Jackson DVM, PhD5
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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Pathology, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5B4.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5B4.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5B4.
  • | 4 Department of Veterinary Pathology, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5B4.
  • | 5 Department of Veterinary Pathology, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5B4.

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether vaccine site-associated sarcomas (VSS) from cats contain polyomavirus antigen or DNA.

Sample Population—50 formalin-fixed paraffinembedded tissue blocks of VSS from cats.

Procedure—Sections from each tissue block were evaluated for polyomavirus antigen by use of an avidin-biotin-complex immunohistochemical staining method, using rabbit anti-murine polyomavirus polyclonal antiserum as the primary antibody. The DNA was extracted from sections of each tissue block, and a polymerase chain reaction assay was performed, using primers designed to amplify regions of the bovine polyomavirus genome and consensus polyomavirus primers designed to detect unknown polyomaviruses.

Results—Polyomavirus antigen and DNA were not detected in any of the VSS.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that polyomaviruses likely do not have any direct involvement in the pathogenesis of VSS in cats. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:828–832)

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether vaccine site-associated sarcomas (VSS) from cats contain polyomavirus antigen or DNA.

Sample Population—50 formalin-fixed paraffinembedded tissue blocks of VSS from cats.

Procedure—Sections from each tissue block were evaluated for polyomavirus antigen by use of an avidin-biotin-complex immunohistochemical staining method, using rabbit anti-murine polyomavirus polyclonal antiserum as the primary antibody. The DNA was extracted from sections of each tissue block, and a polymerase chain reaction assay was performed, using primers designed to amplify regions of the bovine polyomavirus genome and consensus polyomavirus primers designed to detect unknown polyomaviruses.

Results—Polyomavirus antigen and DNA were not detected in any of the VSS.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that polyomaviruses likely do not have any direct involvement in the pathogenesis of VSS in cats. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:828–832)