Advertisement

Effects of acetylpromazine or morphine on urine production in halothane-anesthetized dogs

Sheilah A. RobertsonDepartments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314.
Present address is Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0136.

Search for other papers by Sheilah A. Robertson in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
,
Joseph G. HauptmanDepartments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314.

Search for other papers by Joseph G. Hauptman in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
,
Ray F. NachreinerLarge Animal Clinical Sciences and Animal Health Diagnostic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314.

Search for other papers by Ray F. Nachreiner in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
, and
Marlee A. RichterDepartments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314.

Search for other papers by Marlee A. Richter in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

Abstract

Objective—To assess the influence of preanesthetic administration of acetylpromazine or morphine and fluids on urine production, arginine vasopressin (AVP; previously known as antidiuretic hormone) concentrations, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), plasma osmolality (Osm), PCV, and concentration of total solids (TS) during anesthesia and surgery in dogs.

Animals—19 adult dogs.

Procedure—Concentration of AVP, indirect MAP, Osm, PCV, and concentration of TS were measured at 5 time points (before administration of acetylpromazine or morphine, after administration of those drugs, after induction of anesthesia, 1 hour after the start of surgery, and 2 hours after the start of surgery). Urine output and end-tidal halothane concentrations were measured 1 and 2 hours after the start of surgery. All dogs were administered lactated Ringer's solution (20 ml/kg of body weight/h, IV) during surgery.

Results—Compared with values for acetylpromazine, preoperative administration of morphine resulted in significantly lower urine output during the surgical period. Groups did not differ significantly for AVP concentration, Osm, MAP, and end-tidal halothane concentration; however, PCV and concentration of TS decreased over time in both groups and were lower in dogs given acetylpromazine.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Preanesthetic administration of morphine resulted in significantly lower urine output, compared with values after administration of acetylpromazine, which cannot be explained by differences in AVP concentration or MAP. When urine output is used as a guide for determining rate for IV administration of fluids in the perioperative period, the type of preanesthetic agent used must be considered.(Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1922–1927)

Abstract

Objective—To assess the influence of preanesthetic administration of acetylpromazine or morphine and fluids on urine production, arginine vasopressin (AVP; previously known as antidiuretic hormone) concentrations, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), plasma osmolality (Osm), PCV, and concentration of total solids (TS) during anesthesia and surgery in dogs.

Animals—19 adult dogs.

Procedure—Concentration of AVP, indirect MAP, Osm, PCV, and concentration of TS were measured at 5 time points (before administration of acetylpromazine or morphine, after administration of those drugs, after induction of anesthesia, 1 hour after the start of surgery, and 2 hours after the start of surgery). Urine output and end-tidal halothane concentrations were measured 1 and 2 hours after the start of surgery. All dogs were administered lactated Ringer's solution (20 ml/kg of body weight/h, IV) during surgery.

Results—Compared with values for acetylpromazine, preoperative administration of morphine resulted in significantly lower urine output during the surgical period. Groups did not differ significantly for AVP concentration, Osm, MAP, and end-tidal halothane concentration; however, PCV and concentration of TS decreased over time in both groups and were lower in dogs given acetylpromazine.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Preanesthetic administration of morphine resulted in significantly lower urine output, compared with values after administration of acetylpromazine, which cannot be explained by differences in AVP concentration or MAP. When urine output is used as a guide for determining rate for IV administration of fluids in the perioperative period, the type of preanesthetic agent used must be considered.(Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1922–1927)