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Use of an intravitreal sustained-release cyclosporine delivery device for treatment of equine recurrent uveitis

Brian C. GilgerComparative Ophthalmology Research Laboratories, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606.

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 DVM, MS
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David A. WilkieDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Michael G. DavidsonComparative Ophthalmology Research Laboratories, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606.

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Janice B. AllenComparative Ophthalmology Research Laboratories, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606.

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 PhD

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the use of an intravitreal sustained-release cyclosporine (CsA) delivery device for treatment of horses with naturally occurring recurrent uveitis.

Animals—16 horses with recurrent uveitis.

Procedures—Horses with frequent recurrent episodes of uveitis or with disease that was progressing despite appropriate medication were selected for this study. Additional inclusion criteria included adequate retinal function as determined by use of electroretinography, lack of severe cataract formation, and no vision-threatening ocular complications (eg, retinal detachment, severe retinal degeneration, and posterior synechia). Sustained-release CsA delivery devices (4 µg of CsA/d) were implanted into the vitreous through a sclerotomy at the pars plana. Reexaminations were performed 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after implantation, then continued annually. Ophthalmic changes, number of recurrent episodes of uveitis, and vision were recorded.

Results—The rate of recurrent episodes after device implantation (0.36 episodes/y) was less than prior to surgery (7.5 episodes/y). In addition, only 3 horses developed episodes of recurrent uveitis after surgery. Vision was detected in 14 of 16 affected eyes at a mean follow-up time of 13.8 months (range, 6 to 24 months).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—This intravitreal sustained-release CsA delivery device may be a safe and important tool for long-term treatment of horses with chronic recurrent uveitis. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1892–1896)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the use of an intravitreal sustained-release cyclosporine (CsA) delivery device for treatment of horses with naturally occurring recurrent uveitis.

Animals—16 horses with recurrent uveitis.

Procedures—Horses with frequent recurrent episodes of uveitis or with disease that was progressing despite appropriate medication were selected for this study. Additional inclusion criteria included adequate retinal function as determined by use of electroretinography, lack of severe cataract formation, and no vision-threatening ocular complications (eg, retinal detachment, severe retinal degeneration, and posterior synechia). Sustained-release CsA delivery devices (4 µg of CsA/d) were implanted into the vitreous through a sclerotomy at the pars plana. Reexaminations were performed 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after implantation, then continued annually. Ophthalmic changes, number of recurrent episodes of uveitis, and vision were recorded.

Results—The rate of recurrent episodes after device implantation (0.36 episodes/y) was less than prior to surgery (7.5 episodes/y). In addition, only 3 horses developed episodes of recurrent uveitis after surgery. Vision was detected in 14 of 16 affected eyes at a mean follow-up time of 13.8 months (range, 6 to 24 months).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—This intravitreal sustained-release CsA delivery device may be a safe and important tool for long-term treatment of horses with chronic recurrent uveitis. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1892–1896)