Spatial distribution of seropositivity to the causative agent of granulocytic ehrlichiosis in dogs in California

Janet E. Foley Department of Medicine and Epidemiology School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
Center for Companion Animal Health School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Search for other papers by Janet E. Foley in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
,
Patrick Foley Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Sacramento, CA 95819.

Search for other papers by Patrick Foley in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD
, and
John E. Madigan Department of Medicine and Epidemiology School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Search for other papers by John E. Madigan in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Abstract

Objective—To assess spatial and temporal patterns of seroprevalence among dogs in California to the causative agent of granulocytic ehrlichiosis (GE).

Sample Population—Sera of 1,082 clinically normal dogs from 54 of 59 counties in California in 1997 to 1998.

Procedure—Serum-specific IgG reactivity to Ehrlichia equi was assessed by use of an immunofluorescent antibody assay, using E equi-infected horse neutrophils as substrate. Data were analyzed, using a geographic information system. Spatial analysis of seroprevalence included first order Bayesian analysis of seroprevalence and second order analysis of clustering by K-function and Cuzick-Edwards tests. Monthly seroprevalence among dogs was examined by use of regression on monthly densities of Ixodes pacificus adults and nymphs .

Results—Seroprevalence among dogs to E equi was 8.68%. Data were seasonally bimodal with highest prevalence in winter (when adult ticks were abundant) and a secondary peak in late spring (corresponding to nymphal ticks). Humboldt County had the highest seroprevalence (47.3%), and other northern coast range counties had seroprevalence from 15 to 30%.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—The patchy distribution of exposure to Ehrlichia organisms is a subset of the distribution of the tick vector. This may reflect enzootic cycles or climatic or historical factors that limited the range of the disease. Dogs, horses, and humans from north coast range counties in California are at increased risk of GE. These data provide a background for assessing risk of infection in horses and dogs, depending on geographic location. Dogs may be sentinels for assessing risk of GE in humans. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1599–1605)

Abstract

Objective—To assess spatial and temporal patterns of seroprevalence among dogs in California to the causative agent of granulocytic ehrlichiosis (GE).

Sample Population—Sera of 1,082 clinically normal dogs from 54 of 59 counties in California in 1997 to 1998.

Procedure—Serum-specific IgG reactivity to Ehrlichia equi was assessed by use of an immunofluorescent antibody assay, using E equi-infected horse neutrophils as substrate. Data were analyzed, using a geographic information system. Spatial analysis of seroprevalence included first order Bayesian analysis of seroprevalence and second order analysis of clustering by K-function and Cuzick-Edwards tests. Monthly seroprevalence among dogs was examined by use of regression on monthly densities of Ixodes pacificus adults and nymphs .

Results—Seroprevalence among dogs to E equi was 8.68%. Data were seasonally bimodal with highest prevalence in winter (when adult ticks were abundant) and a secondary peak in late spring (corresponding to nymphal ticks). Humboldt County had the highest seroprevalence (47.3%), and other northern coast range counties had seroprevalence from 15 to 30%.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—The patchy distribution of exposure to Ehrlichia organisms is a subset of the distribution of the tick vector. This may reflect enzootic cycles or climatic or historical factors that limited the range of the disease. Dogs, horses, and humans from north coast range counties in California are at increased risk of GE. These data provide a background for assessing risk of infection in horses and dogs, depending on geographic location. Dogs may be sentinels for assessing risk of GE in humans. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1599–1605)

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 60 0 0
Full Text Views 403 271 25
PDF Downloads 116 59 2
Advertisement