Effect of a leukocyte-depleting filter in an extracorporeal circuit used for low-flow ischemia and reperfusion of equine jejunum

Linda M. Van Hoogmoed Comparative Gastroenterology Laboratory, Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Jack R. Snyder Comparative Gastroenterology Laboratory, Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Jorge G. Nieto Comparative Gastroenterology Laboratory, Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Faye A. Harmon Comparative Gastroenterology Laboratory, Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Brenna L. Timmerma Comparative Gastroenterology Laboratory, Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Abstract

Objective—To determine effect of leukocyte depletion on hematologic, morphologic, and metabolic variables of equine jejunum after induction of arterial lowflow ischemia and reperfusion by use of an extracorporeal circuit.

Animals—14 healthy adult horses.

Procedure—A segment of jejunum was surgically removed and maintained in an isolated circuit for 3 hours (control group), arterial flow was reduced to 20% of baseline for 40 minutes followed by 1 hour of reperfusion (low-flow group), or leukocyte depletion was filter-induced, and low-flow ischemia and reperfusion were conducted as in the low-flow control group (filter-treated group). Various metabolic, hemodynamic, and histomorphologic variables were evaluated, including effects of electrical field stimulation and L- N-nitro-arginine-methyl-ester (L-NAME) on contractile activity.

Results—The extracorporeal circuit appeared to maintain the jejunum within physiologic limits for an extended period. Low-flow ischemia with reperfusion induced significant differences in various measurements, compared with control specimens. Significant differences were not detected between the low-flow and filter-treated groups. Myeloperoxidase activity was greater in the low-flow group than the control group, whereas a difference was not detected between control and filter-treated groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The extracorporeal circuit maintained intestine for 3 hours in a physiologic state and may be used for simulation of tissue injury. Leukocyte depletion generally did not attenuate the effects of low-flow ischemia and reperfusion on equine small intestine. ( Am J Vet Res 2001;62:87–96)

Abstract

Objective—To determine effect of leukocyte depletion on hematologic, morphologic, and metabolic variables of equine jejunum after induction of arterial lowflow ischemia and reperfusion by use of an extracorporeal circuit.

Animals—14 healthy adult horses.

Procedure—A segment of jejunum was surgically removed and maintained in an isolated circuit for 3 hours (control group), arterial flow was reduced to 20% of baseline for 40 minutes followed by 1 hour of reperfusion (low-flow group), or leukocyte depletion was filter-induced, and low-flow ischemia and reperfusion were conducted as in the low-flow control group (filter-treated group). Various metabolic, hemodynamic, and histomorphologic variables were evaluated, including effects of electrical field stimulation and L- N-nitro-arginine-methyl-ester (L-NAME) on contractile activity.

Results—The extracorporeal circuit appeared to maintain the jejunum within physiologic limits for an extended period. Low-flow ischemia with reperfusion induced significant differences in various measurements, compared with control specimens. Significant differences were not detected between the low-flow and filter-treated groups. Myeloperoxidase activity was greater in the low-flow group than the control group, whereas a difference was not detected between control and filter-treated groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The extracorporeal circuit maintained intestine for 3 hours in a physiologic state and may be used for simulation of tissue injury. Leukocyte depletion generally did not attenuate the effects of low-flow ischemia and reperfusion on equine small intestine. ( Am J Vet Res 2001;62:87–96)

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