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Evaluation of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues obtained from vaccine site-associated sarcomas of cats for DNA of feline immunodeficiency virus

Beverly A. KidneyDepartment of Veterinary Pathology, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5B4.

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John A. EllisDepartment of Veterinary Microbiology, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5B4.

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Deborah M. HainesDepartment of Veterinary Microbiology, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5B4.

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Marion L. JacksonDepartment of Veterinary Pathology, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5B4.

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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the use of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method for detection of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) DNA, using formalin-fixed paraffin- embedded (FFPE) tissues, and to use this method to evaluate tissues obtained from vaccine site-associated sarcomas (VSS) of cats for FIV DNA.

Sample Population—50 FFPE tissue blocks from VSS of cats and 50 FFPE tissue blocks from cutaneous non-vaccine site-associated fibrosarcomas (non-VSS) of cats.

Procedure—DNA was extracted from FFPE sections of each tumor and regions of the gag gene of FIV were amplified by a PCR, using 3 sets of primers. Sensitivity of the method was compared between frozen and FFPE tissues, using splenic tissue obtained from a cat that had been experimentally infected with FIV.

Results—We did not detect FIV DNA in VSS or non- VSS tissues. Sensitivity of the PCR method was identical for frozen or FFPE tissues.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—It is possible to detect FIV DNA in FFPE tissues by use of a PCR. We did not find evidence to support direct FIV involvement in the pathogenesis of VSS in cats. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:1037–1041)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the use of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method for detection of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) DNA, using formalin-fixed paraffin- embedded (FFPE) tissues, and to use this method to evaluate tissues obtained from vaccine site-associated sarcomas (VSS) of cats for FIV DNA.

Sample Population—50 FFPE tissue blocks from VSS of cats and 50 FFPE tissue blocks from cutaneous non-vaccine site-associated fibrosarcomas (non-VSS) of cats.

Procedure—DNA was extracted from FFPE sections of each tumor and regions of the gag gene of FIV were amplified by a PCR, using 3 sets of primers. Sensitivity of the method was compared between frozen and FFPE tissues, using splenic tissue obtained from a cat that had been experimentally infected with FIV.

Results—We did not detect FIV DNA in VSS or non- VSS tissues. Sensitivity of the PCR method was identical for frozen or FFPE tissues.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—It is possible to detect FIV DNA in FFPE tissues by use of a PCR. We did not find evidence to support direct FIV involvement in the pathogenesis of VSS in cats. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:1037–1041)