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Effects of dietary antioxidant supplementation on oxidative damage and resistance to oxidative damage during prolonged exercise in sled dogs

Carole R. BaskinDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Veterinary Teaching Hospital, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
present address is Children's Hospital Wexner Research Institute, 700 Children's Dr, Columbus, OH 43205.

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 DVM, MS
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Kenneth W. HinchcliffDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Veterinary Teaching Hospital, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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 BVSc, PhD
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Robert A. DiSilvestroDepartment of Human Nutrition, College of Human Ecology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Gregg A. ReinhartResearch and Development, the Iams Co, PO Box 189, Lewisburg, OH 45338.

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Michael G. HayekResearch and Development, the Iams Co, PO Box 189, Lewisburg, OH 45338.

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Boon P. ChewDepartment of Animal Sciences, College of Agriculture, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.

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John R. BurrResearch and Development, the Iams Co, PO Box 189, Lewisburg, OH 45338.

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Richard A. SwensonLightning Bolt Express Kennel, 7075 Pawprint Trail, Two Rivers, AK 99716.

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Abstract

Objectives—To determine effects of dietary antioxidant supplementation on plasma concentrations of antioxidants, exercise-induced oxidative damage, and resistance to oxidative damage during exercise in Alaskan sled dogs.

Animals—62 Alaskan sled dogs.

Procedure—Dogs were matched for age, sex, and ability and assigned to 1 of 3 groups: sedentary and nonsupplemented (control [C]; n = 21), exercised and supplemented (S; 22), and exercised and nonsupplemented (N; 19). Dogs in group S were given 400 units of α- tocopherol acetate, 3 mg of β-carotene, and 20 mg of lutein orally per day for 1 month, then dogs in groups S and N completed 3 days of exercise. Blood samples were collected before and after 1 and 3 days of exercise and after 3 days of rest. Plasma antioxidant concentrations were determined, and oxidative damage to DNA (plasma 7,8 dihydro-8-oxo-2'deoxyguanosine [8-oxodG] concentration) and membrane lipids (plasma hydroperoxide concentration) and resistance of plasma lipoproteins to oxidation were assessed.

Results—Supplementation increased plasma concentrations of α-tocopherol, β-carotene, and lutein. Plasma concentration of α-tocopherol increased and concentration of lutein decreased in group S with exercise. Concentration of 8-oxodG decreased in group S but increased in group N during and after exercise. Lag time of in vitro oxidation of lipoprotein particles increased with exercise in group S only.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Dietary supplementation with antioxidants resulted in increased plasma concentrations of antioxidants. Moreover, supplementation decreased DNA oxidation and increased resistance of lipoprotein particles to in vitro oxidation. Antioxidant supplementation of sled dogs may attenuate exercise-induced oxidative damage. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:886–891)

Abstract

Objectives—To determine effects of dietary antioxidant supplementation on plasma concentrations of antioxidants, exercise-induced oxidative damage, and resistance to oxidative damage during exercise in Alaskan sled dogs.

Animals—62 Alaskan sled dogs.

Procedure—Dogs were matched for age, sex, and ability and assigned to 1 of 3 groups: sedentary and nonsupplemented (control [C]; n = 21), exercised and supplemented (S; 22), and exercised and nonsupplemented (N; 19). Dogs in group S were given 400 units of α- tocopherol acetate, 3 mg of β-carotene, and 20 mg of lutein orally per day for 1 month, then dogs in groups S and N completed 3 days of exercise. Blood samples were collected before and after 1 and 3 days of exercise and after 3 days of rest. Plasma antioxidant concentrations were determined, and oxidative damage to DNA (plasma 7,8 dihydro-8-oxo-2'deoxyguanosine [8-oxodG] concentration) and membrane lipids (plasma hydroperoxide concentration) and resistance of plasma lipoproteins to oxidation were assessed.

Results—Supplementation increased plasma concentrations of α-tocopherol, β-carotene, and lutein. Plasma concentration of α-tocopherol increased and concentration of lutein decreased in group S with exercise. Concentration of 8-oxodG decreased in group S but increased in group N during and after exercise. Lag time of in vitro oxidation of lipoprotein particles increased with exercise in group S only.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Dietary supplementation with antioxidants resulted in increased plasma concentrations of antioxidants. Moreover, supplementation decreased DNA oxidation and increased resistance of lipoprotein particles to in vitro oxidation. Antioxidant supplementation of sled dogs may attenuate exercise-induced oxidative damage. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:886–891)