Advertisement

Evaluation of the measurement of leukotriene B4 concentrations in exhaled condensate as a noninvasive method for assessing mediators of inflammation in the lungs of calves

Petra Reinhold Dr med vetFederal Institute for Health Protection of Consumers and Veterinary Medicine, Jena Branch, Naumburger St 96a, D-07743 Jena, Germany.

Search for other papers by Petra Reinhold Dr med vet in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD
,
Gunther Becher Dr medResearch Company of Lung and Chest Diseases Ltd, Robert-Rössle-St 10, D-13125 Berlin- Buch, Germany.

Search for other papers by Gunther Becher Dr med in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Michael Rothe Dr rer natResearch Company of Lung and Chest Diseases Ltd, Robert-Rössle-St 10, D-13125 Berlin- Buch, Germany.

Search for other papers by Michael Rothe Dr rer nat in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether measurement of an inflammatory mediator in exhaled condensate could provide a noninvasive method for evaluating lungs of calves.

Animals—84 calves ≤ 2 months old.

Procedure—Concentration of leukotriene B4 (LTB4) was evaluated in the exhaled condensate of healthy calves and calves with experimentally induced respiratory tract infections. For collection of samples of exhaled condensate, the total amount of exhaled air was directed into a cooled double-jacketed tube. Each tube was sealed and stored at –80 C. The LTB4 concentration was measured, using an ELISA.

Results—In exhaled condensates of clinically healthy calves, normally distributed and highly reproducible LTB4 concentrations (mean ± SD, 116.1 ± 55.4 pg/ml) were measured. After experimentally induced infection with Pasteurella multocida serovar D, LTB4 in exhaled condensate increased significantly (mean, 179% increase), compared with basal concentrations before infection; this increase in LTB4 was significantly correlated with deterioration in lung function. In 2 of 4 calves experimentally infected with bovine respiratory syncytial virus, the LTB4 concentration in exhaled condensate increased (300 to 400% increase), compared with baseline values, which was associated with development of bronchial hyperresponsiveness after infection.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Collection of exhaled condensate is tolerated well by calves and is an acceptable method for obtaining fluid from exhaled air originating from the lungs. This method provides alternatives for diagnosing and evaluating treatment of naturally acquired and experimentally induced diseases of the lungs and airways in calves. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:742–749)

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether measurement of an inflammatory mediator in exhaled condensate could provide a noninvasive method for evaluating lungs of calves.

Animals—84 calves ≤ 2 months old.

Procedure—Concentration of leukotriene B4 (LTB4) was evaluated in the exhaled condensate of healthy calves and calves with experimentally induced respiratory tract infections. For collection of samples of exhaled condensate, the total amount of exhaled air was directed into a cooled double-jacketed tube. Each tube was sealed and stored at –80 C. The LTB4 concentration was measured, using an ELISA.

Results—In exhaled condensates of clinically healthy calves, normally distributed and highly reproducible LTB4 concentrations (mean ± SD, 116.1 ± 55.4 pg/ml) were measured. After experimentally induced infection with Pasteurella multocida serovar D, LTB4 in exhaled condensate increased significantly (mean, 179% increase), compared with basal concentrations before infection; this increase in LTB4 was significantly correlated with deterioration in lung function. In 2 of 4 calves experimentally infected with bovine respiratory syncytial virus, the LTB4 concentration in exhaled condensate increased (300 to 400% increase), compared with baseline values, which was associated with development of bronchial hyperresponsiveness after infection.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Collection of exhaled condensate is tolerated well by calves and is an acceptable method for obtaining fluid from exhaled air originating from the lungs. This method provides alternatives for diagnosing and evaluating treatment of naturally acquired and experimentally induced diseases of the lungs and airways in calves. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:742–749)