Impedance audiometric measurements in clinically normal dogs

Lynette K. Cole Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Michael Podell Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Kenneth W. Kwochka Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

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Abstract

Objective—To measure impedance audiometric values in clinically normal dogs that were sedated or anesthetized, evaluate effects of ear flushing on tympanometric measurements, and determine effects of performing acoustic reflex testing in a sound-attenuated room.

Animals—35 mixed-breed and purebred clientowned dogs and 21 laboratory-bred Beagles.

Procedures—Tympanometry and acoustic reflex testing were performed on 27 mixed-breed and purebred dogs under isoflurane anesthesia in a non–sound-attenuated room and 21 Beagles under sedation in a sound-attenuated room. Tympanometry was performed on 8 mixed-breed dogs under halothane anesthesia before and after ear canal flushing.

Results—Among impedance audiometric values, ear canal volume and compliance peak were smaller in Beagles than in mixed-breed dogs; differences among other values were not detected. Ear canal volume was dependent on body weight. Differences were not found for tympanometric values measured before and after ear canal flushing.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of this study established reference range values for impedance audiometric measurements in clinically normal dogs under isoflurane anesthesia or sedation. Acoustic reflex testing does not need to be performed in a sound-attenuated room. The ear canals of clinically normal dogs can be flushed prior to performing tympanometry without altering the results. Impedance audiometry may be a useful noninvasive procedure for the diagnosis of otitis media in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:442–445)

Abstract

Objective—To measure impedance audiometric values in clinically normal dogs that were sedated or anesthetized, evaluate effects of ear flushing on tympanometric measurements, and determine effects of performing acoustic reflex testing in a sound-attenuated room.

Animals—35 mixed-breed and purebred clientowned dogs and 21 laboratory-bred Beagles.

Procedures—Tympanometry and acoustic reflex testing were performed on 27 mixed-breed and purebred dogs under isoflurane anesthesia in a non–sound-attenuated room and 21 Beagles under sedation in a sound-attenuated room. Tympanometry was performed on 8 mixed-breed dogs under halothane anesthesia before and after ear canal flushing.

Results—Among impedance audiometric values, ear canal volume and compliance peak were smaller in Beagles than in mixed-breed dogs; differences among other values were not detected. Ear canal volume was dependent on body weight. Differences were not found for tympanometric values measured before and after ear canal flushing.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of this study established reference range values for impedance audiometric measurements in clinically normal dogs under isoflurane anesthesia or sedation. Acoustic reflex testing does not need to be performed in a sound-attenuated room. The ear canals of clinically normal dogs can be flushed prior to performing tympanometry without altering the results. Impedance audiometry may be a useful noninvasive procedure for the diagnosis of otitis media in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:442–445)

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