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Comparison of equine amnion and a nonadherent wound dressing material for bandaging pinch-grafted wounds in ponies

Laurie R. Goodrich DVM, MS1, H. David Moll DVM, MS2, Mark V. Crisman DVM, MS3, Pierre Lessard DVM, MPVM, PhD4, and Rocky B. Bigbie DVM, MS5
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  • 1 From the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech and University of Maryland, Blacksburg, VA 24061.
  • | 2 From the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech and University of Maryland, Blacksburg, VA 24061.
  • | 3 From the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech and University of Maryland, Blacksburg, VA 24061.
  • | 4 From the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech and University of Maryland, Blacksburg, VA 24061.
  • | 5 From the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech and University of Maryland, Blacksburg, VA 24061.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate healing of pinch-grafted wounds on the distal aspect of the limbs of ponies bandaged with equine amnion or a standard nonadherent wound dressing material.

Animals—6 ponies.

Procedure—A 2.5 × 2.5-cm full-thickness section of skin was removed from the dorsal aspect of each limb at the midpoint of the metacarpus or metatarsus. Six days later, wounds were grafted with partial-thickness pinch grafts. Half the wounds were bandaged with amnion, and the other half were bandaged with a nonadherent dressing. Bandages were changed every 3 days until wound healing was complete. At each bandage change, numbers of grafts lost were recorded, and wounds were measured.

Results—Percentage of grafts lost from wounds bandaged with amnion was not significantly different from percentage lost from wounds bandaged with the nonadherent dressing. Median healing time for wounds bandaged with amnion (30 days) was significantly less than median healing time for wounds bandaged with the nonadherent dressing (39 days). All wounds were healed by day 45.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that amnion can be used for bandaging pinchgrafted wounds on the distal aspect of the limbs of ponies. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:326–329)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate healing of pinch-grafted wounds on the distal aspect of the limbs of ponies bandaged with equine amnion or a standard nonadherent wound dressing material.

Animals—6 ponies.

Procedure—A 2.5 × 2.5-cm full-thickness section of skin was removed from the dorsal aspect of each limb at the midpoint of the metacarpus or metatarsus. Six days later, wounds were grafted with partial-thickness pinch grafts. Half the wounds were bandaged with amnion, and the other half were bandaged with a nonadherent dressing. Bandages were changed every 3 days until wound healing was complete. At each bandage change, numbers of grafts lost were recorded, and wounds were measured.

Results—Percentage of grafts lost from wounds bandaged with amnion was not significantly different from percentage lost from wounds bandaged with the nonadherent dressing. Median healing time for wounds bandaged with amnion (30 days) was significantly less than median healing time for wounds bandaged with the nonadherent dressing (39 days). All wounds were healed by day 45.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that amnion can be used for bandaging pinchgrafted wounds on the distal aspect of the limbs of ponies. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:326–329)