Limb loading activity of adult horses confined to box stalls in an equine hospital barn

Laurie A. McDuffee JD Wheat Veterinary Orthopedic Research Laboratory, Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Cell Biology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
present address is the Department of Health Management, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Ave, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada C1A 4P3.

Search for other papers by Laurie A. McDuffee in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
,
Susan M. Stover JD Wheat Veterinary Orthopedic Research Laboratory, Department of Anatomy, Physiology, and Cell Biology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Search for other papers by Susan M. Stover in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
, and
Kim Coleman Prosthetics Research Study, Seattle, WA 98122.

Search for other papers by Kim Coleman in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 MS

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Abstract

Objective—To determine a range of limb loading activity for healthy adult horses confined to box stalls in an equine veterinary teaching hospital and determine the effects of hospital environmental factors on load rates and daily limb loading patterns.

Animals—6 mature healthy horses of various ages, breeds, and sexes, and 1 horse with a repaired metatarsal fracture.

Procedure—Step monitors were placed on 2 limbs of adult horses confined to box stalls. Relocation steps and weight shifts were recorded, as loading events, for 24 hours. Influence of forelimb versus hind limb and environmental factors on load rate (loading events per hour) were assessed with repeated-measures ANOVA.

Results—Loading activity was greater for the forelimb than the hind limb and was greater during the day than the night. Loading activity differences were not associated with daytime environmental factors.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Horses with normal locomotor activity appear to have higher load rates for forelimbs compared with hind limbs and higher load rates during the day compared with night. Knowledge of influence of environmental factors and mechanical restraint on limb loading activity may be useful in management of horses with musculoskeletal disorders. This information may also be used for in vitro simulation of in vivo loading of limbs during cyclic biomechanical investigations.(Am J Vet Res 2000;61:234–237)

Abstract

Objective—To determine a range of limb loading activity for healthy adult horses confined to box stalls in an equine veterinary teaching hospital and determine the effects of hospital environmental factors on load rates and daily limb loading patterns.

Animals—6 mature healthy horses of various ages, breeds, and sexes, and 1 horse with a repaired metatarsal fracture.

Procedure—Step monitors were placed on 2 limbs of adult horses confined to box stalls. Relocation steps and weight shifts were recorded, as loading events, for 24 hours. Influence of forelimb versus hind limb and environmental factors on load rate (loading events per hour) were assessed with repeated-measures ANOVA.

Results—Loading activity was greater for the forelimb than the hind limb and was greater during the day than the night. Loading activity differences were not associated with daytime environmental factors.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Horses with normal locomotor activity appear to have higher load rates for forelimbs compared with hind limbs and higher load rates during the day compared with night. Knowledge of influence of environmental factors and mechanical restraint on limb loading activity may be useful in management of horses with musculoskeletal disorders. This information may also be used for in vitro simulation of in vivo loading of limbs during cyclic biomechanical investigations.(Am J Vet Res 2000;61:234–237)

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 62 0 0
Full Text Views 303 126 12
PDF Downloads 193 96 7
Advertisement