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Norepinephrine kinetics in dogs with experimentally induced renal vascular hypertension

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  • 1 Department of Physiology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Chulalongkorn University, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330, Thailand.
  • | 2 Department of Physiology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Chulalongkorn University, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330, Thailand.
  • | 3 Department of Physiology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Chulalongkorn University, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330, Thailand.
  • | 4 Department of Physiology, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Chulalongkorn University, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330, Thailand.
  • | 5 Present address is RR1, Box 3355, Stonington, ME 04681.

Abstract

Objective—To determine norepinephrine (NE) kinetics in dogs with experimentally induced renal vascular hypertension.

Animals—4 mixed-breed dogs.

Procedure—The study comprised a control and hypertensive period. The hypertensive period followed induction of renal vascular hypertension achieved by surgical placement of clips on both renal arteries to reduce diameter by approximately 80%. Arterial blood pressure, renal clearance, and NE kinetics were measured during each period while dogs were receiving a low-sodium diet. Measurements of NE kinetics and renal clearance during the hypertensive period were made 5 days after induction of hypertension.

Results—Five days after induction of hypertension, arterial blood pressure increased by 15 to 20 mm Hg. Mean (± SEM) plasma NE concentration and NE spillover rate increased significantly from 151.5 ± 14.1 pg/ml and 8.03 ± 0.62 ng/kg/min, respectively, during the control period to 631.4 ± 30.5 pg/ml and 54.0 ± 5.2 ng/kg/min, respectively, during the hypertensive period. Norepinephrine clearance rate also increased (54.0 ± 2.4 vs 86.0 ± 9.3 ml/kg/min). Positive associations between mean arterial pressure (MAP) and NE concentration and spillover rate were detected. However, MAP and NE clearance rate were not associated.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Increased blood pressure during the hypertensive period was likely attributable to increased NE spillover rate, which resulted in a significant increase in plasma NE concentration. Analysis of these results suggests that central sympathetic outflow was increased and may be responsible for the pathogenesis of high blood pressure during the acute phase of renal vascular hypertension in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61: 1534–1541)

Abstract

Objective—To determine norepinephrine (NE) kinetics in dogs with experimentally induced renal vascular hypertension.

Animals—4 mixed-breed dogs.

Procedure—The study comprised a control and hypertensive period. The hypertensive period followed induction of renal vascular hypertension achieved by surgical placement of clips on both renal arteries to reduce diameter by approximately 80%. Arterial blood pressure, renal clearance, and NE kinetics were measured during each period while dogs were receiving a low-sodium diet. Measurements of NE kinetics and renal clearance during the hypertensive period were made 5 days after induction of hypertension.

Results—Five days after induction of hypertension, arterial blood pressure increased by 15 to 20 mm Hg. Mean (± SEM) plasma NE concentration and NE spillover rate increased significantly from 151.5 ± 14.1 pg/ml and 8.03 ± 0.62 ng/kg/min, respectively, during the control period to 631.4 ± 30.5 pg/ml and 54.0 ± 5.2 ng/kg/min, respectively, during the hypertensive period. Norepinephrine clearance rate also increased (54.0 ± 2.4 vs 86.0 ± 9.3 ml/kg/min). Positive associations between mean arterial pressure (MAP) and NE concentration and spillover rate were detected. However, MAP and NE clearance rate were not associated.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Increased blood pressure during the hypertensive period was likely attributable to increased NE spillover rate, which resulted in a significant increase in plasma NE concentration. Analysis of these results suggests that central sympathetic outflow was increased and may be responsible for the pathogenesis of high blood pressure during the acute phase of renal vascular hypertension in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61: 1534–1541)