Antibody titer against bovine respiratory syncytial virus in colostrum-fed dairy calves born in various seasons

Wim H. M. van der Poel From the Department of Herd Health and Reproduction, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 7, 3584 CL Utrecht (van der Poel, Schukken), The Netherlands, and the Department of Mammalian Virology, Institute for Animal Science and Health, ID-DLO, PO Box 65, 8200 AB Lelystad (Middel), The Netherlands.

Search for other papers by Wim H. M. van der Poel in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD, DVM
,
Wiechert G. J. Middel From the Department of Herd Health and Reproduction, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 7, 3584 CL Utrecht (van der Poel, Schukken), The Netherlands, and the Department of Mammalian Virology, Institute for Animal Science and Health, ID-DLO, PO Box 65, 8200 AB Lelystad (Middel), The Netherlands.

Search for other papers by Wiechert G. J. Middel in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Ynte H. Schukken From the Department of Herd Health and Reproduction, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 7, 3584 CL Utrecht (van der Poel, Schukken), The Netherlands, and the Department of Mammalian Virology, Institute for Animal Science and Health, ID-DLO, PO Box 65, 8200 AB Lelystad (Middel), The Netherlands.

Search for other papers by Ynte H. Schukken in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD

Abstract

Objective

To determine antibody titer against bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) in dairy calves on farms and to investigate whether passively acquired antibody titers differ in calves born in various seasons.

Sample Population

Serum samples from 129 colostrum-fed replacement calves in 8 dairy herds.

Procedure

A standard ELISA was used to determine BRSV-specific antibodies in serum samples obtained monthly, and antibody titers for calves born in various seasons were compared.

Results

BRSV-specific antibody titer in colostrum-fed dairy calves decreased to undetectable values at 3 to 4 months old. Calves born in winter generally had lower titers, compared with those for calves born in other seasons (P< 0.05). Titers in calves born in seasons other than winter did not differ.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Calves born in winter generally have lower BRSV-specific antibody titers, which may be caused by generally lower antibody titers in colostrum or by factors influencing colostrum intake. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:1098-1101)

Abstract

Objective

To determine antibody titer against bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) in dairy calves on farms and to investigate whether passively acquired antibody titers differ in calves born in various seasons.

Sample Population

Serum samples from 129 colostrum-fed replacement calves in 8 dairy herds.

Procedure

A standard ELISA was used to determine BRSV-specific antibodies in serum samples obtained monthly, and antibody titers for calves born in various seasons were compared.

Results

BRSV-specific antibody titer in colostrum-fed dairy calves decreased to undetectable values at 3 to 4 months old. Calves born in winter generally had lower titers, compared with those for calves born in other seasons (P< 0.05). Titers in calves born in seasons other than winter did not differ.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Calves born in winter generally have lower BRSV-specific antibody titers, which may be caused by generally lower antibody titers in colostrum or by factors influencing colostrum intake. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:1098-1101)

Advertisement