Familial clustering and risk analysis for fragmented coronoid process and elbow joint incongruity in Bernese Mountain Dogs in The Netherlands

Geert J. Ubbink From the Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals (Ubbink, Hazewinkle, van de Broek, Rothuizen), and Center of Biostatistics (van de Broek), Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, The Netherlands.

Search for other papers by Geert J. Ubbink in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM
,
Herman A. W. Hazewinkel From the Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals (Ubbink, Hazewinkle, van de Broek, Rothuizen), and Center of Biostatistics (van de Broek), Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, The Netherlands.

Search for other papers by Herman A. W. Hazewinkel in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
,
Jan van de Broek From the Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals (Ubbink, Hazewinkle, van de Broek, Rothuizen), and Center of Biostatistics (van de Broek), Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, The Netherlands.

Search for other papers by Jan van de Broek in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 PhD
, and
Jan Rothuizen From the Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals (Ubbink, Hazewinkle, van de Broek, Rothuizen), and Center of Biostatistics (van de Broek), Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, The Netherlands.

Search for other papers by Jan Rothuizen in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Abstract

Objective

To analyze familial clustering and genetic risk for various forms of elbow dysplasia (ED) in Bernese Mountain Dogs (BMD) in The Netherlands and define possible means to select against ED.

Animals

98 BMD born in 1992 and 64 BMD born in 1995.

Procedure

Dogs were examined radiographically when 12 to 18 months old. The population was resolved into familial clusters, and distribution of ED for the clusters was analyzed. Common ancestors associated with each form of ED were identified, and risk for having ED in the 64 offspring born in 1995 was calculated by relatedness to common ancestors. Risk was compared with radiographic outcome.

Results

The 2 forms of ED identified were fragmented coronoid process (FCP) and elbow joint incongruity (INC). Incidence of ED decreased from 63/98 (64%) in 1992 to 29/64 (45%) in 1995. None of the familial clusters was free of FCP or INC. Common ancestors associated with FCP differed from those associated with INC. There was more potential variation in risk for FCP and INC in the 64 offspring than was achieved by breeders, indicating a decrease in population heterogeneity.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

FCP and INC had differing familial sources; thus, they most likely are different genetic traits. Although Incidence of ED decreased from 1992 through 1995, we did not detect variation among pedigrees in genetic risk for ED remaining in the offspring born in 1995; thus, selection among families cannot further improve ED health status of BMD in The Netherlands. Phenotypic selection within families remains the only alternative. [Am J Vet Res 1999;60:1082-1087)

Abstract

Objective

To analyze familial clustering and genetic risk for various forms of elbow dysplasia (ED) in Bernese Mountain Dogs (BMD) in The Netherlands and define possible means to select against ED.

Animals

98 BMD born in 1992 and 64 BMD born in 1995.

Procedure

Dogs were examined radiographically when 12 to 18 months old. The population was resolved into familial clusters, and distribution of ED for the clusters was analyzed. Common ancestors associated with each form of ED were identified, and risk for having ED in the 64 offspring born in 1995 was calculated by relatedness to common ancestors. Risk was compared with radiographic outcome.

Results

The 2 forms of ED identified were fragmented coronoid process (FCP) and elbow joint incongruity (INC). Incidence of ED decreased from 63/98 (64%) in 1992 to 29/64 (45%) in 1995. None of the familial clusters was free of FCP or INC. Common ancestors associated with FCP differed from those associated with INC. There was more potential variation in risk for FCP and INC in the 64 offspring than was achieved by breeders, indicating a decrease in population heterogeneity.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

FCP and INC had differing familial sources; thus, they most likely are different genetic traits. Although Incidence of ED decreased from 1992 through 1995, we did not detect variation among pedigrees in genetic risk for ED remaining in the offspring born in 1995; thus, selection among families cannot further improve ED health status of BMD in The Netherlands. Phenotypic selection within families remains the only alternative. [Am J Vet Res 1999;60:1082-1087)

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 31 31 3
PDF Downloads 39 39 8
Advertisement