Detection of feline herpesvirus-specific antibodies and DNA in aqueous humor from cats with or without uveitis

David J. Maggs From the Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (Maggs, Nasisse), and the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (Lappin).

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Michael R. Lappin From the Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (Maggs, Nasisse), and the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (Lappin).

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Mark P. Nasisse From the Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (Maggs, Nasisse), and the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (Lappin).

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Abstract

Objective

To determine whether uveitis in cats was associated with intraocular production of feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1)-specific antibodies or with detection of FHV-1 DNA in aqueous humor (AH).

Animals

44 cats with idiopathic uveitis, 29 cats with uveitis attributed to Toxoplasma gondii infection, 13 FHV-1 seropositive cats without uveitis, and 9 FHV-1 seronegative cats without uveitis.

Procedure

ELISA were used to detect FHV-1-specific antibodies and total IgG antibodies in serum and AH, and the Goldmann-Witmer coefficient (C-value) for intraocular antibody production was calculated. A polymerase chain reaction assay was used to detect FHV-1 dna in AH.

Results

FHV-1 seroprevalence among cats with uveitis was not significantly different from seroprevalence among cats without uveitis. Intraocular FHV-1 antibodies were never detected in cats without uveitis. Significantly more cats with idiopathic uveitis (22/44) or with toxoplasmic uveitis (11/29) had evidence of intraocular antibody production (C-value > 1) than did cats without uveitis. Only cats with idiopathic uveitis had FHV-1 C-values > 8. Among cats with evidence of intraocular antibody production, cats with idiopathic uveitis had a significantly higher median FHV-1 C-value (9.61) than did cats with toxoplasmic uveitis (2.56). Overall, FHV-1 DNA was detected in AH from 12 cats, 11 of which had uveitis.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Results suggest that FHV-1 can infect intraocular tissues of cats and that intraocular FHV-1 infection may be associated with uveal inflammation in some cats. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:932–936)

Abstract

Objective

To determine whether uveitis in cats was associated with intraocular production of feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1)-specific antibodies or with detection of FHV-1 DNA in aqueous humor (AH).

Animals

44 cats with idiopathic uveitis, 29 cats with uveitis attributed to Toxoplasma gondii infection, 13 FHV-1 seropositive cats without uveitis, and 9 FHV-1 seronegative cats without uveitis.

Procedure

ELISA were used to detect FHV-1-specific antibodies and total IgG antibodies in serum and AH, and the Goldmann-Witmer coefficient (C-value) for intraocular antibody production was calculated. A polymerase chain reaction assay was used to detect FHV-1 dna in AH.

Results

FHV-1 seroprevalence among cats with uveitis was not significantly different from seroprevalence among cats without uveitis. Intraocular FHV-1 antibodies were never detected in cats without uveitis. Significantly more cats with idiopathic uveitis (22/44) or with toxoplasmic uveitis (11/29) had evidence of intraocular antibody production (C-value > 1) than did cats without uveitis. Only cats with idiopathic uveitis had FHV-1 C-values > 8. Among cats with evidence of intraocular antibody production, cats with idiopathic uveitis had a significantly higher median FHV-1 C-value (9.61) than did cats with toxoplasmic uveitis (2.56). Overall, FHV-1 DNA was detected in AH from 12 cats, 11 of which had uveitis.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Results suggest that FHV-1 can infect intraocular tissues of cats and that intraocular FHV-1 infection may be associated with uveal inflammation in some cats. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:932–936)

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