Use of breath hydrogen testing to detect experimentally induced disaccharide malabsorption in healthy adult dogs

Anette Spohr From the Small Animal Hospital, the Department of Clinical Studies, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Copenhagen. Denmark (Spohr, Vibe-Petersen); and Animal and Biomedical Sciences, Institute of Veterinary Medicine (Guilford) and the Department of Statistics (Haslett), Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.

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W. Grant Guilford From the Small Animal Hospital, the Department of Clinical Studies, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Copenhagen. Denmark (Spohr, Vibe-Petersen); and Animal and Biomedical Sciences, Institute of Veterinary Medicine (Guilford) and the Department of Statistics (Haslett), Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.

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Stephen J. Haslett From the Small Animal Hospital, the Department of Clinical Studies, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Copenhagen. Denmark (Spohr, Vibe-Petersen); and Animal and Biomedical Sciences, Institute of Veterinary Medicine (Guilford) and the Department of Statistics (Haslett), Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.

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Gunvor Vibe-Petersen From the Small Animal Hospital, the Department of Clinical Studies, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Copenhagen. Denmark (Spohr, Vibe-Petersen); and Animal and Biomedical Sciences, Institute of Veterinary Medicine (Guilford) and the Department of Statistics (Haslett), Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.

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Abstract

Objective

To develop a noninvasive method to detect disaccharide malabsorption in dogs by measuring hydrogen concentration ([H2]) in exhaled breath before and after experimentally induced disaccharide malabsorption.

Animals

8 healthy mixed-breed dogs.

Procedure

[H2] was measured every 30 minutes for 8 hours after administration of disaccharide solutions (lactose, 0.5 g/kg of body weight; lactose, 1.0 g/kg; sucrose, 2.0 g/kg; maltose, 1.5 g/kg; and lactose [0.5 g/kg] and sucrose [2.0 g/kg]) to determine reference ranges of [H2] for each solution, which were compared with [H2] in dogs with experimentally induced disaccharide malabsorption. To induce disaccharide malabsorption, dogs were given a mild overdose of lactose (1.5 g/kg) or a disaccharidase inhibitor. In the latter experiment, acarbose (10 mg/kg, PO) was given with the combination of lactose (0.5 g/kg) and sucrose (2 g/kg), and with maltose (1.5 g/kg).

Results

Overdosing with lactose resulted in [H2] persistently outside the reference range for lactose in 5 of 8 dogs. Acarbose administration resulted in [H2] persistently outside the reference range in 7 of 8 dogs that received a combination of sucrose and lactose but did not consistently affect [H2] after administration of maltose.

Conclusions

Disaccharide malabsorption resulted in [H2] outside the reference ranges in most of the adult dogs studied, suggesting that the technique may be useful in detecting naturally occurring disaccharidase deficiency. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:836–840)

Abstract

Objective

To develop a noninvasive method to detect disaccharide malabsorption in dogs by measuring hydrogen concentration ([H2]) in exhaled breath before and after experimentally induced disaccharide malabsorption.

Animals

8 healthy mixed-breed dogs.

Procedure

[H2] was measured every 30 minutes for 8 hours after administration of disaccharide solutions (lactose, 0.5 g/kg of body weight; lactose, 1.0 g/kg; sucrose, 2.0 g/kg; maltose, 1.5 g/kg; and lactose [0.5 g/kg] and sucrose [2.0 g/kg]) to determine reference ranges of [H2] for each solution, which were compared with [H2] in dogs with experimentally induced disaccharide malabsorption. To induce disaccharide malabsorption, dogs were given a mild overdose of lactose (1.5 g/kg) or a disaccharidase inhibitor. In the latter experiment, acarbose (10 mg/kg, PO) was given with the combination of lactose (0.5 g/kg) and sucrose (2 g/kg), and with maltose (1.5 g/kg).

Results

Overdosing with lactose resulted in [H2] persistently outside the reference range for lactose in 5 of 8 dogs. Acarbose administration resulted in [H2] persistently outside the reference range in 7 of 8 dogs that received a combination of sucrose and lactose but did not consistently affect [H2] after administration of maltose.

Conclusions

Disaccharide malabsorption resulted in [H2] outside the reference ranges in most of the adult dogs studied, suggesting that the technique may be useful in detecting naturally occurring disaccharidase deficiency. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:836–840)

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