Comparison of stance time and velocity as control variables in force plate analysis of dogs

Walter C. Renberg From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (Renberg, Johnston); the Department of Statistics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (Ye); and the Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30603 (Budsberg).

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Spencer A. Johnston From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (Renberg, Johnston); the Department of Statistics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (Ye); and the Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30603 (Budsberg).

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Keying Ye From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (Renberg, Johnston); the Department of Statistics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (Ye); and the Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30603 (Budsberg).

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Steven C. Budsberg From the Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (Renberg, Johnston); the Department of Statistics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (Ye); and the Department of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30603 (Budsberg).

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Abstract

Objective

To investigate effects of the use of stance time or velocity as control variables on ground reaction forces in lame dogs.

Animals

12 dogs with pelvic osteotomies.

Procedure

Data for ground reaction forces were obtained preoperatively and at 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, and 28 weeks postoperatively, using velocity and stance time as control variables. Ground reaction forces obtained were compared between the 2 methods of data collection, as were velocities and stance times of the trials.

Results

Significant differences in ground reaction forces were not found between the use of velocity or stance time as a control variable at any time. Also, significant differences in stance times or velocities were not found between the 2 methods of data collection. Greatest variation in stance time and velocity was found during periods of greatest lameness.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Use of stance time as a control variable in force plate analysis does not lead to significantly different results from use of velocity as a control variable, indicating that either method may be used in force plate analysis of dogs. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:814–819)

Abstract

Objective

To investigate effects of the use of stance time or velocity as control variables on ground reaction forces in lame dogs.

Animals

12 dogs with pelvic osteotomies.

Procedure

Data for ground reaction forces were obtained preoperatively and at 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, and 28 weeks postoperatively, using velocity and stance time as control variables. Ground reaction forces obtained were compared between the 2 methods of data collection, as were velocities and stance times of the trials.

Results

Significant differences in ground reaction forces were not found between the use of velocity or stance time as a control variable at any time. Also, significant differences in stance times or velocities were not found between the 2 methods of data collection. Greatest variation in stance time and velocity was found during periods of greatest lameness.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Use of stance time as a control variable in force plate analysis does not lead to significantly different results from use of velocity as a control variable, indicating that either method may be used in force plate analysis of dogs. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:814–819)

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