Scintigraphic, sonographic, and histologic evaluation of renal autotransplantation in cats

Susan M. Newell From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Newell, Ellison, Graham, Lanz, Smith, Van Gilder) and Pathobiology (Ginn), and the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (Harrison), the University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.

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Gary W. Ellison From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Newell, Ellison, Graham, Lanz, Smith, Van Gilder) and Pathobiology (Ginn), and the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (Harrison), the University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.

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John P. Graham From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Newell, Ellison, Graham, Lanz, Smith, Van Gilder) and Pathobiology (Ginn), and the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (Harrison), the University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.

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Pamela E. Ginn From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Newell, Ellison, Graham, Lanz, Smith, Van Gilder) and Pathobiology (Ginn), and the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (Harrison), the University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.

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Otto I. Lanz From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Newell, Ellison, Graham, Lanz, Smith, Van Gilder) and Pathobiology (Ginn), and the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (Harrison), the University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.

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Jay M. Harrison From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Newell, Ellison, Graham, Lanz, Smith, Van Gilder) and Pathobiology (Ginn), and the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (Harrison), the University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.

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Jeffrey S. Smith From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Newell, Ellison, Graham, Lanz, Smith, Van Gilder) and Pathobiology (Ginn), and the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (Harrison), the University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.

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James M. Van Gilder From the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences (Newell, Ellison, Graham, Lanz, Smith, Van Gilder) and Pathobiology (Ginn), and the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (Harrison), the University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.

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Abstract

Objective

To determine scintigraphic, sonographic, and histologic changes associated with renal autotransplantation in cats.

Animals

7 adult specific-pathogen-free cats: 5 males, 2 females, 1 to 9 years old.

Procedure

Renal autotransplantation was performed by moving a kidney (5 left, 2 right) to the left iliac fossa. Before and at multiple times after surgery, for a total of 28 days, cats were evaluated by B-mode and Doppler ultrasonography, scintigraphy, and renal biopsy.

Results

By 24 hours after surgery, a significant decrease (42%) in mean glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and an increase in mean renal size (81% increase in cross-sectional area) were evident in the transplanted kidney, compared with preoperative values. By postsurgery day 28, reduction in GFR was 23%. Significant changes in renal blood flow velocity were identified in both kidneys. Consistent changes in resistive index or pulsatility index for either kidney could not be identified. When all postoperative histologic data were combined, the histologic score, indicating degree and numbers of abnormalities detected, for the transplanted kidney was significantly higher than that for the control kidney.

Conclusions

Significant changes in renal function, size, and histologic abnormalities develop secondary to acute tubular necrosis in cats after uncomplicated renal autotransplantation.

Clinical Relevance

Evaluation of renal size and function may be of benefit for clinical evaluation of feline renal transplant patients, whereas measurement of the resistive index may be of little clinical value. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:775–779)

Abstract

Objective

To determine scintigraphic, sonographic, and histologic changes associated with renal autotransplantation in cats.

Animals

7 adult specific-pathogen-free cats: 5 males, 2 females, 1 to 9 years old.

Procedure

Renal autotransplantation was performed by moving a kidney (5 left, 2 right) to the left iliac fossa. Before and at multiple times after surgery, for a total of 28 days, cats were evaluated by B-mode and Doppler ultrasonography, scintigraphy, and renal biopsy.

Results

By 24 hours after surgery, a significant decrease (42%) in mean glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and an increase in mean renal size (81% increase in cross-sectional area) were evident in the transplanted kidney, compared with preoperative values. By postsurgery day 28, reduction in GFR was 23%. Significant changes in renal blood flow velocity were identified in both kidneys. Consistent changes in resistive index or pulsatility index for either kidney could not be identified. When all postoperative histologic data were combined, the histologic score, indicating degree and numbers of abnormalities detected, for the transplanted kidney was significantly higher than that for the control kidney.

Conclusions

Significant changes in renal function, size, and histologic abnormalities develop secondary to acute tubular necrosis in cats after uncomplicated renal autotransplantation.

Clinical Relevance

Evaluation of renal size and function may be of benefit for clinical evaluation of feline renal transplant patients, whereas measurement of the resistive index may be of little clinical value. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:775–779)

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