In vitro response of large colon arterial and venous rings to vasodilating drugs in horses

Steven A. Sedrish From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Sedrish, Koch, Moore) and Veterinary Physiology, Pharmacology, and Toxicology (Venugopalan, Holmes, Moore), School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803.

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 MS, DVM
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Changaram S. Venugopalan From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Sedrish, Koch, Moore) and Veterinary Physiology, Pharmacology, and Toxicology (Venugopalan, Holmes, Moore), School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803.

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Earnestine P. Holmes From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Sedrish, Koch, Moore) and Veterinary Physiology, Pharmacology, and Toxicology (Venugopalan, Holmes, Moore), School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803.

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Catherine E. Koch From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Sedrish, Koch, Moore) and Veterinary Physiology, Pharmacology, and Toxicology (Venugopalan, Holmes, Moore), School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803.

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Rustin M. Moore From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Sedrish, Koch, Moore) and Veterinary Physiology, Pharmacology, and Toxicology (Venugopalan, Holmes, Moore), School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803.

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Abstract

Objective

To determine in vitro vasomotor response of equine large colon arterial and venous rings with and without endothelium to vasodilator drugs, including dopamine (DOP), dopexamine (DPX), acepromazine (ACE), isoxsuprine (ISX), and nifedipine (NFP).

Animals

7 adult horses.

Procedure

Relaxation of large colon arteries and veins in response to vasodilating drugs was determined by measuring the change in tension of vessel rings when exposed to a cumulative concentration range (10−8 to 10−4 M) of each drug. Vessel rings, with and without endothelium, were mounted in organ baths, attached to a transducer, and contracted with norepinephrine (NE). Cumulative concentration-response relationships, percentage maximal relaxation, and EC50 (concentration of drug required to relax the NE-induced contracted tissue to 50% of its contracted state) values were calculated.

Results

There were significant differences among drugs for EC50 (ACE = ISX < NFP) and percentage maximal relaxation (ACE = ISX > NFP = DPX > DOP) values in veins. Endothelium removal from veins had no significant effect. There were no differences in EC50 values for arteries; however, percentage maximal relaxation was significantly different among drugs (ACE = ISX = NFP > DPX = DOP). Endothelial removal resulted in higher EC50 and lower percentage maximal relaxation values, compared with endothelium-intact arteries.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance

ACE and ISX were the most potent and efficacious drugs evaluated and could potentially be used to improve blood flow after correction of large-colon volvulus. Dopamine cannot be recommended because of its biphasic response and potential to further decrease blood flow. Endothelium removal altered the vasodilatory responses of colonic arterial rings, but did not affect venous rings. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60: 204-210)

Abstract

Objective

To determine in vitro vasomotor response of equine large colon arterial and venous rings with and without endothelium to vasodilator drugs, including dopamine (DOP), dopexamine (DPX), acepromazine (ACE), isoxsuprine (ISX), and nifedipine (NFP).

Animals

7 adult horses.

Procedure

Relaxation of large colon arteries and veins in response to vasodilating drugs was determined by measuring the change in tension of vessel rings when exposed to a cumulative concentration range (10−8 to 10−4 M) of each drug. Vessel rings, with and without endothelium, were mounted in organ baths, attached to a transducer, and contracted with norepinephrine (NE). Cumulative concentration-response relationships, percentage maximal relaxation, and EC50 (concentration of drug required to relax the NE-induced contracted tissue to 50% of its contracted state) values were calculated.

Results

There were significant differences among drugs for EC50 (ACE = ISX < NFP) and percentage maximal relaxation (ACE = ISX > NFP = DPX > DOP) values in veins. Endothelium removal from veins had no significant effect. There were no differences in EC50 values for arteries; however, percentage maximal relaxation was significantly different among drugs (ACE = ISX = NFP > DPX = DOP). Endothelial removal resulted in higher EC50 and lower percentage maximal relaxation values, compared with endothelium-intact arteries.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance

ACE and ISX were the most potent and efficacious drugs evaluated and could potentially be used to improve blood flow after correction of large-colon volvulus. Dopamine cannot be recommended because of its biphasic response and potential to further decrease blood flow. Endothelium removal altered the vasodilatory responses of colonic arterial rings, but did not affect venous rings. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60: 204-210)

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