Scintigraphic evaluation of dogs with acute synovitis after treatment with glucosamine hydrochloride and chondroitin sulfate

Sherman O. Canapp Jr. From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, (Canapp, McLaughlin, Hoskinson, Roush), and the Department of Statistics (Butine), Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

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 DVM, MS
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Ronald M. McLaughlin Jr. From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, (Canapp, McLaughlin, Hoskinson, Roush), and the Department of Statistics (Butine), Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

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James J. Hoskinson From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, (Canapp, McLaughlin, Hoskinson, Roush), and the Department of Statistics (Butine), Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

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James K. Roush From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, (Canapp, McLaughlin, Hoskinson, Roush), and the Department of Statistics (Butine), Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

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Michael D. Butine From the Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, (Canapp, McLaughlin, Hoskinson, Roush), and the Department of Statistics (Butine), Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

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 PhD

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Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the effects of orally administered glucosamine hydrochloride (GIAm)–chondroitin sulfate (sCS) and GIAM–CS–S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) on chemically induced synovitis in the radiocarpal joint of dogs.

Animals

32 adult mixed-breed dogs.

Procedure

For 21 days, all dogs received a sham capsule (3 groups) or GIAm-CS (prior treatment group) in a double-blinded study. Unilateral carpal synovitis was induced by injecting the right radiocarpal joint with chymopapain and the left radiocarpal joint (control joint) with saline (0.9% NaCl) solution. Joints were injected on alternate days for 3 injections. After induction of synovitis, 2 groups receiving sham treatment were given GIAm-CS or GIAm-CS–SAMe. Another group continued to receive sham capsules (control group). Joint inflammation was quantified, using nuclear scintigraphy, before injection of joints and days 13, 20, 27, 34, 41, and 48 after injection. Lameness evaluations were performed daily.

Results

Dogs given GIAm-CS before induction of synovitis had significantly less scintigraphic activity in the soft-tissue phase 48 days after joint injection, significantly less uptake in the bone phase 41 and 48 days after joint injection, and significantly lower lameness scores on days 12 to 19, 23, and 24 after injection, compared with other groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Analysis of results of this study suggest that prior treatment with GIAm-CS for 21 days had a protective effect against chemically induced synovitis and associated bone remodeling. Prior treatment with GIAm-CS also reduced lameness in dogs with induced synovitis. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:1552–1557)

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the effects of orally administered glucosamine hydrochloride (GIAm)–chondroitin sulfate (sCS) and GIAM–CS–S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAMe) on chemically induced synovitis in the radiocarpal joint of dogs.

Animals

32 adult mixed-breed dogs.

Procedure

For 21 days, all dogs received a sham capsule (3 groups) or GIAm-CS (prior treatment group) in a double-blinded study. Unilateral carpal synovitis was induced by injecting the right radiocarpal joint with chymopapain and the left radiocarpal joint (control joint) with saline (0.9% NaCl) solution. Joints were injected on alternate days for 3 injections. After induction of synovitis, 2 groups receiving sham treatment were given GIAm-CS or GIAm-CS–SAMe. Another group continued to receive sham capsules (control group). Joint inflammation was quantified, using nuclear scintigraphy, before injection of joints and days 13, 20, 27, 34, 41, and 48 after injection. Lameness evaluations were performed daily.

Results

Dogs given GIAm-CS before induction of synovitis had significantly less scintigraphic activity in the soft-tissue phase 48 days after joint injection, significantly less uptake in the bone phase 41 and 48 days after joint injection, and significantly lower lameness scores on days 12 to 19, 23, and 24 after injection, compared with other groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Analysis of results of this study suggest that prior treatment with GIAm-CS for 21 days had a protective effect against chemically induced synovitis and associated bone remodeling. Prior treatment with GIAm-CS also reduced lameness in dogs with induced synovitis. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:1552–1557)

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