Plasma amino acid profiles in cats with naturally acquired chronic renal failure

Richard E. Goldstein From the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (Goldstein), the Department of Medicine and Epidemiology (Marks, Cowgill), the Department of Population Health and Reproduction (Kass), and the Department of Molecular Biosciences (Rogers), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Stanley L. Marks From the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (Goldstein), the Department of Medicine and Epidemiology (Marks, Cowgill), the Department of Population Health and Reproduction (Kass), and the Department of Molecular Biosciences (Rogers), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Larry D. Cowgill From the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (Goldstein), the Department of Medicine and Epidemiology (Marks, Cowgill), the Department of Population Health and Reproduction (Kass), and the Department of Molecular Biosciences (Rogers), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Philip H. Kass From the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (Goldstein), the Department of Medicine and Epidemiology (Marks, Cowgill), the Department of Population Health and Reproduction (Kass), and the Department of Molecular Biosciences (Rogers), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Quinton R. Rogers From the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (Goldstein), the Department of Medicine and Epidemiology (Marks, Cowgill), the Department of Population Health and Reproduction (Kass), and the Department of Molecular Biosciences (Rogers), School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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 PhD

Abstract

Objective

To characterize potential changes in preprandial plasma amino acid concentrations in cats with naturally acquired chronic renal failure (CRF), compared with healthy cats, and to assess potential effects of the severity of renal failure on plasma amino acid concentrations in these cats.

Animals

62 adult cats.

Procedure

Preprandial plasma amino acid concentrations were evaluated in 38 cats with mild, moderate, or severe CRF and in 24 apparently healthy cats. Effects of severity of renal failure, amount of dietary protein, degree of weight loss, appetite, and body condition on plasma amino acid profiles were evaluated.

Results

Cats with various stages of CRF had significantly (P < 0.05) decreased plasma concentrations of o-hydroxyproline, glutamate, proline, glycine, alanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, and arginine, and significantly increased plasma concentrations of asparagine, citrulline, ornithine, 1-methylhistidine, and 3-methylhistidine. Significant (P < 0.05) alterations in amino acid concentrations also were identified when cats with CRF were grouped by appetite or severity of renal disease. Amount of dietary protein, body condition, or degree of weight loss had no significant effect on plasma amino acid concentrations.

Conclusions

Compared with those in healthy cats, preprandial plasma amino acid profiles in cats with mild, moderate, or severe CRF are abnormal.

Clinical Relevance

Despite frequency of altered plasma amino acid concentrations in cats with CRF, the magnitude of these changes is mild and of little clinical relevance. Short-term use of a commercial protein-restricted diet has no deleterious effects on plasma amino acid concentrations. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:109–113)

Abstract

Objective

To characterize potential changes in preprandial plasma amino acid concentrations in cats with naturally acquired chronic renal failure (CRF), compared with healthy cats, and to assess potential effects of the severity of renal failure on plasma amino acid concentrations in these cats.

Animals

62 adult cats.

Procedure

Preprandial plasma amino acid concentrations were evaluated in 38 cats with mild, moderate, or severe CRF and in 24 apparently healthy cats. Effects of severity of renal failure, amount of dietary protein, degree of weight loss, appetite, and body condition on plasma amino acid profiles were evaluated.

Results

Cats with various stages of CRF had significantly (P < 0.05) decreased plasma concentrations of o-hydroxyproline, glutamate, proline, glycine, alanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, and arginine, and significantly increased plasma concentrations of asparagine, citrulline, ornithine, 1-methylhistidine, and 3-methylhistidine. Significant (P < 0.05) alterations in amino acid concentrations also were identified when cats with CRF were grouped by appetite or severity of renal disease. Amount of dietary protein, body condition, or degree of weight loss had no significant effect on plasma amino acid concentrations.

Conclusions

Compared with those in healthy cats, preprandial plasma amino acid profiles in cats with mild, moderate, or severe CRF are abnormal.

Clinical Relevance

Despite frequency of altered plasma amino acid concentrations in cats with CRF, the magnitude of these changes is mild and of little clinical relevance. Short-term use of a commercial protein-restricted diet has no deleterious effects on plasma amino acid concentrations. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:109–113)

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