Duration of effects of dietary fish oil supplementation on serum eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid concentrations in dogs

Rodney A. Hansen From the Medical Oncology Research Laboratory, Comparative Oncology Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences (Hansen, Ogilvie, Walton, Richardson) and the Department of Pathology (Fettman), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biological Sciences; the Department of Statistics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (Mallinckrodt); and the Hill's Science and Technology Center, Topeka, KS 66601 (Davenport, Gross, Hand).

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Gregory K. Ogilvie From the Medical Oncology Research Laboratory, Comparative Oncology Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences (Hansen, Ogilvie, Walton, Richardson) and the Department of Pathology (Fettman), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biological Sciences; the Department of Statistics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (Mallinckrodt); and the Hill's Science and Technology Center, Topeka, KS 66601 (Davenport, Gross, Hand).

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Deborah J. Davenport From the Medical Oncology Research Laboratory, Comparative Oncology Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences (Hansen, Ogilvie, Walton, Richardson) and the Department of Pathology (Fettman), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biological Sciences; the Department of Statistics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (Mallinckrodt); and the Hill's Science and Technology Center, Topeka, KS 66601 (Davenport, Gross, Hand).

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Kathy L. Gross From the Medical Oncology Research Laboratory, Comparative Oncology Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences (Hansen, Ogilvie, Walton, Richardson) and the Department of Pathology (Fettman), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biological Sciences; the Department of Statistics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (Mallinckrodt); and the Hill's Science and Technology Center, Topeka, KS 66601 (Davenport, Gross, Hand).

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Judy A. Walton From the Medical Oncology Research Laboratory, Comparative Oncology Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences (Hansen, Ogilvie, Walton, Richardson) and the Department of Pathology (Fettman), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biological Sciences; the Department of Statistics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (Mallinckrodt); and the Hill's Science and Technology Center, Topeka, KS 66601 (Davenport, Gross, Hand).

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Kristi L. Richardson From the Medical Oncology Research Laboratory, Comparative Oncology Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences (Hansen, Ogilvie, Walton, Richardson) and the Department of Pathology (Fettman), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biological Sciences; the Department of Statistics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (Mallinckrodt); and the Hill's Science and Technology Center, Topeka, KS 66601 (Davenport, Gross, Hand).

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Craig H. Mallinckrodt From the Medical Oncology Research Laboratory, Comparative Oncology Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences (Hansen, Ogilvie, Walton, Richardson) and the Department of Pathology (Fettman), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biological Sciences; the Department of Statistics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (Mallinckrodt); and the Hill's Science and Technology Center, Topeka, KS 66601 (Davenport, Gross, Hand).

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Michael S. Hand From the Medical Oncology Research Laboratory, Comparative Oncology Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences (Hansen, Ogilvie, Walton, Richardson) and the Department of Pathology (Fettman), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biological Sciences; the Department of Statistics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (Mallinckrodt); and the Hill's Science and Technology Center, Topeka, KS 66601 (Davenport, Gross, Hand).

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Martin J. Fettman From the Medical Oncology Research Laboratory, Comparative Oncology Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences (Hansen, Ogilvie, Walton, Richardson) and the Department of Pathology (Fettman), College of Veterinary Medicine and Biological Sciences; the Department of Statistics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (Mallinckrodt); and the Hill's Science and Technology Center, Topeka, KS 66601 (Davenport, Gross, Hand).

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SUMMARY

Objective

To determine how long serum concentrations of ω-3 fatty acids remain elevated after cessation of dietary fish oil supplementation.

Animals

12 healthy Beagles.

Procedure

Baseline serum concentrations of linoleic acid, linolenic acid, arachidonic acid (AA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were measured. Dogs were then fed a diet supplemented with soybean oil or fish oil for 8 weeks, and serum fatty acid concentrations were measured while dogs were fed the experimental diets and for 18 weeks after they were switched to a maintenance diet.

Results

For dogs fed the fish oil diet, serum EPA and DHA concentrations were significantly increased by week 1 and remained increased for 7 (DHA concentration) or 3 (EPA concentration) weeks after dietary fish oil supplementation was discontinued.

Conclusions

In dogs, supplementation of the diet with fish oil may have effects for several weeks after dietary supplementation is discontinued.

Clinical Relevance

Studies of the effects of fish oil supplementation that use a crossover design should allow for an appropriate washout period. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:864–868)

SUMMARY

Objective

To determine how long serum concentrations of ω-3 fatty acids remain elevated after cessation of dietary fish oil supplementation.

Animals

12 healthy Beagles.

Procedure

Baseline serum concentrations of linoleic acid, linolenic acid, arachidonic acid (AA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were measured. Dogs were then fed a diet supplemented with soybean oil or fish oil for 8 weeks, and serum fatty acid concentrations were measured while dogs were fed the experimental diets and for 18 weeks after they were switched to a maintenance diet.

Results

For dogs fed the fish oil diet, serum EPA and DHA concentrations were significantly increased by week 1 and remained increased for 7 (DHA concentration) or 3 (EPA concentration) weeks after dietary fish oil supplementation was discontinued.

Conclusions

In dogs, supplementation of the diet with fish oil may have effects for several weeks after dietary supplementation is discontinued.

Clinical Relevance

Studies of the effects of fish oil supplementation that use a crossover design should allow for an appropriate washout period. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:864–868)

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