Comparison of isoflurane with sevoflurane for anesthesia induction and recovery in adult dogs

Rebecca A. Johnson From the Departments of Comparative Biosciences and Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (Johnson, Brunson), and the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences and Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314 (Striler, Sawyer).

Search for other papers by Rebecca A. Johnson in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS
,
Elaine Striler From the Departments of Comparative Biosciences and Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (Johnson, Brunson), and the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences and Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314 (Striler, Sawyer).

Search for other papers by Elaine Striler in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Donald C. Sawyer From the Departments of Comparative Biosciences and Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (Johnson, Brunson), and the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences and Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314 (Striler, Sawyer).

Search for other papers by Donald C. Sawyer in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, PhD
, and
David B. Brunson From the Departments of Comparative Biosciences and Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (Johnson, Brunson), and the Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences and Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314 (Striler, Sawyer).

Search for other papers by David B. Brunson in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
 DVM, MS

Click on author name to view affiliation information

Abstract

Objective

To compare mask anesthesia induction and recovery characteristics between 2 inhalant anesthetic agents: isoflurane and sevoflurane.

Animals

16 clinically normal, young adult Beagles.

Procedure

Using a cross-over design, dogs were randomly selected to receive sevoflurane or isoflurane via a face mask and a circle anesthetic system. Vaporizer setting concentrations were increased in step-wise, equal minimum alveolar concentrations (MAC) for each anesthetic until the vaporizer setting of 2.6% for isoflurane or 4.8% for sevoflurane (2 MAC) was reached. Concentration was kept constant until the dog had a negative tail clamp response and was intubated. End-tidal concentration was maintained at 1.8 to 2.0% or 3.3 to 3.8% for isoflurane or sevoflurane, respectively (1.4 to 1.6 MAC) for 30 minutes. Dogs were allowed to recover with only tail clamp stimulation until a positive response was obtained. Extubation was performed when a spontaneous swallow reflex was observed. Dogs were allowed to achieve sternal recumbency and stand unassisted without further stimulation.

Results

Sevoflurane induction resulted in shorter time to loss of palpebral reflex, negative tail clamp response, and time to tracheal intubation, and was of better quality than isoflurane induction. Both anesthetics were associated with rapid and smooth recovery.

Conclusions

Sevoflurane mask induction is faster and of better quality, compared with isoflurane, in adult dogs. Recovery time and quality are comparable.

Clinical Relevance

On the basis of these results, sevoflurane is a suitable inhalant anesthetic for mask induction and recovery in adult dogs and appears to have some advantages over isoflurane, including faster and smoother mask induction. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:478–481)

Abstract

Objective

To compare mask anesthesia induction and recovery characteristics between 2 inhalant anesthetic agents: isoflurane and sevoflurane.

Animals

16 clinically normal, young adult Beagles.

Procedure

Using a cross-over design, dogs were randomly selected to receive sevoflurane or isoflurane via a face mask and a circle anesthetic system. Vaporizer setting concentrations were increased in step-wise, equal minimum alveolar concentrations (MAC) for each anesthetic until the vaporizer setting of 2.6% for isoflurane or 4.8% for sevoflurane (2 MAC) was reached. Concentration was kept constant until the dog had a negative tail clamp response and was intubated. End-tidal concentration was maintained at 1.8 to 2.0% or 3.3 to 3.8% for isoflurane or sevoflurane, respectively (1.4 to 1.6 MAC) for 30 minutes. Dogs were allowed to recover with only tail clamp stimulation until a positive response was obtained. Extubation was performed when a spontaneous swallow reflex was observed. Dogs were allowed to achieve sternal recumbency and stand unassisted without further stimulation.

Results

Sevoflurane induction resulted in shorter time to loss of palpebral reflex, negative tail clamp response, and time to tracheal intubation, and was of better quality than isoflurane induction. Both anesthetics were associated with rapid and smooth recovery.

Conclusions

Sevoflurane mask induction is faster and of better quality, compared with isoflurane, in adult dogs. Recovery time and quality are comparable.

Clinical Relevance

On the basis of these results, sevoflurane is a suitable inhalant anesthetic for mask induction and recovery in adult dogs and appears to have some advantages over isoflurane, including faster and smoother mask induction. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:478–481)

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 194 194 103
PDF Downloads 195 195 107
Advertisement