Clinical and microbiological effects of controlled-release local delivery of minocycline on periodontitis in dogs

Kazuhiko Hayashi From the Departments of Pathology and Microbiology, School of Dentistry at Matsudo, Nihon University, Matsudo-shi, Chiba-ken 271-0061, Japan.

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 DVM, PhD
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Kazuko Takada From the Departments of Pathology and Microbiology, School of Dentistry at Matsudo, Nihon University, Matsudo-shi, Chiba-ken 271-0061, Japan.

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Masatomo Hirasawa From the Departments of Pathology and Microbiology, School of Dentistry at Matsudo, Nihon University, Matsudo-shi, Chiba-ken 271-0061, Japan.

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 DDS, PhD

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Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the clinical and microbiological efficacy of minocycline in a subgingival local delivery system as an adjunct to tooth scaling and root planing in dogs with periodontal disease.

Animals

Nine 4- to 7-year-old Beagles with periodontitis.

Procedure

After scaling of teeth and root planing, 2 treatment and 1 or 2 control sites were selected for each dog: treated sites (n = 18) received minocycline hydrochloride periodontal formulation and control sites (n = 12) received ointment base (no minocycline). Gingival crevicular fluid was collected at a baseline (prior to treatment) and at week 4. Clinical and microbiological effects were evaluated and compared among sites.

Results

In minocycline-treated sites, clinical indices were significantly decreased at week 4, compared with those at baseline. Minocycline-treated sites were associated with a significant decrease in gingival crevicular fluid, probing depth, and bleeding on probing values, compared with those for control sites at week 4. Compared with that for control sites, total bacteria count in periodontal pockets of minocycline-treated sites had an obvious tendency to decrease by week 4. Proportions of Porphyromonas and Fusobacterium spp were significantly decreased at week 4, compared with proportions at control sites and with pretreatment (baseline) values.

Conclusions

When used as an adjunct to tooth scaling and root planing, minocycline periodontal formulation stimulated favorable clinical and antimicrobial responses. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:464–467)

Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the clinical and microbiological efficacy of minocycline in a subgingival local delivery system as an adjunct to tooth scaling and root planing in dogs with periodontal disease.

Animals

Nine 4- to 7-year-old Beagles with periodontitis.

Procedure

After scaling of teeth and root planing, 2 treatment and 1 or 2 control sites were selected for each dog: treated sites (n = 18) received minocycline hydrochloride periodontal formulation and control sites (n = 12) received ointment base (no minocycline). Gingival crevicular fluid was collected at a baseline (prior to treatment) and at week 4. Clinical and microbiological effects were evaluated and compared among sites.

Results

In minocycline-treated sites, clinical indices were significantly decreased at week 4, compared with those at baseline. Minocycline-treated sites were associated with a significant decrease in gingival crevicular fluid, probing depth, and bleeding on probing values, compared with those for control sites at week 4. Compared with that for control sites, total bacteria count in periodontal pockets of minocycline-treated sites had an obvious tendency to decrease by week 4. Proportions of Porphyromonas and Fusobacterium spp were significantly decreased at week 4, compared with proportions at control sites and with pretreatment (baseline) values.

Conclusions

When used as an adjunct to tooth scaling and root planing, minocycline periodontal formulation stimulated favorable clinical and antimicrobial responses. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:464–467)

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