Effect of five percent dehydration on breath hydrogen concentrations in dogs

S. A. Bissett From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Bissett, Guilford) and Statistics (Haslett), Massey University, Private Bag 11222, Palmerston North, New Zealand, and Research and Development, The lams Co, Lewisburg, OH 45338-0189 (Sunvold).

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W. G. Guilford From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Bissett, Guilford) and Statistics (Haslett), Massey University, Private Bag 11222, Palmerston North, New Zealand, and Research and Development, The lams Co, Lewisburg, OH 45338-0189 (Sunvold).

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S. J. Haslett From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Bissett, Guilford) and Statistics (Haslett), Massey University, Private Bag 11222, Palmerston North, New Zealand, and Research and Development, The lams Co, Lewisburg, OH 45338-0189 (Sunvold).

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G. D. Sunvold From the Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences (Bissett, Guilford) and Statistics (Haslett), Massey University, Private Bag 11222, Palmerston North, New Zealand, and Research and Development, The lams Co, Lewisburg, OH 45338-0189 (Sunvold).

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Abstract

Objective

To determine the effect of mild dehydration (5%) on expired breath H2 concentrations in dogs.

Animals

10 healthy, colony-source dogs.

Procedure

Expired breath samples were collected at baseline, and every 90 minutes for 18 hours after ingestion of a test meal (commercial dog food and kibbled wheat) in fully hydrated dogs and in the same dogs when they had lost 5% of their body weight after food and water deprivation. The areas under the breath H2 concentration versus time curves (AUC) for the dehydrated and nondehydrated states were compared, using a two-stage, balanced, crossover, repeated measures technique. The number of breath samples considered to be contaminated by flatus were compared by use of a one-sided sign test.

Results

Expired breath H2 concentration of dogs during the dehydration test period was significantly (P < 0.02) greater than that during the nondehydration test period. In addition, flatulence was significantly (P < 0.033) more frequent in dogs during the dehydration period.

Conclusions

Dehydrated dogs have greater expired breath H2 concentration and produce more flatus after ingestion of a carbohydrate-containing meal. Considered together, these findings suggest that dehydration results in an increase in the net amount of H2 produced in the gastrointestinal tract.

Clinical Relevance

Care should be taken to assess the hydration status, and to correct hydration deficits of dogs prior to breath H2 testing. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:245–249)

Abstract

Objective

To determine the effect of mild dehydration (5%) on expired breath H2 concentrations in dogs.

Animals

10 healthy, colony-source dogs.

Procedure

Expired breath samples were collected at baseline, and every 90 minutes for 18 hours after ingestion of a test meal (commercial dog food and kibbled wheat) in fully hydrated dogs and in the same dogs when they had lost 5% of their body weight after food and water deprivation. The areas under the breath H2 concentration versus time curves (AUC) for the dehydrated and nondehydrated states were compared, using a two-stage, balanced, crossover, repeated measures technique. The number of breath samples considered to be contaminated by flatus were compared by use of a one-sided sign test.

Results

Expired breath H2 concentration of dogs during the dehydration test period was significantly (P < 0.02) greater than that during the nondehydration test period. In addition, flatulence was significantly (P < 0.033) more frequent in dogs during the dehydration period.

Conclusions

Dehydrated dogs have greater expired breath H2 concentration and produce more flatus after ingestion of a carbohydrate-containing meal. Considered together, these findings suggest that dehydration results in an increase in the net amount of H2 produced in the gastrointestinal tract.

Clinical Relevance

Care should be taken to assess the hydration status, and to correct hydration deficits of dogs prior to breath H2 testing. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:245–249)

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