Tumor necrosis factor-α in pregnant cattle after intravenous or subcutaneous vaccination with Brucella abortus strain RB51

Mitchell V. Palmer From the Zoonotic Disease Research Unit, National Animal Disease Center, ARS, USDA, Ames, IA 50010 (Palmer), Growth Biology Laboratory, Livestock and Poultry Sciences Institute, ARS, USDA, BARC-EAST, Beltsville, MD 20705 (Elsasser), and the Department of Veterinary Pathology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (Cheville).

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Theodore H. Elsasser From the Zoonotic Disease Research Unit, National Animal Disease Center, ARS, USDA, Ames, IA 50010 (Palmer), Growth Biology Laboratory, Livestock and Poultry Sciences Institute, ARS, USDA, BARC-EAST, Beltsville, MD 20705 (Elsasser), and the Department of Veterinary Pathology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (Cheville).

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Norman F. Cheville From the Zoonotic Disease Research Unit, National Animal Disease Center, ARS, USDA, Ames, IA 50010 (Palmer), Growth Biology Laboratory, Livestock and Poultry Sciences Institute, ARS, USDA, BARC-EAST, Beltsville, MD 20705 (Elsasser), and the Department of Veterinary Pathology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (Cheville).

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SUMMARY

Objective

To determine the influence of brucellosis vaccination on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) con-centrations in pregnant cattle and the possible role of the bovine placenta in TNF-α production.

Animals

Polled Hereford heifers obtained from a nonvaccinated, brucellosis-free herd and bred at 16 to 27 months at age. All cattle were seronegative for Brucella abortus by results of the standard tube agglutination test.

Procedure

At 6 months' gestation, cattle were vaccinated IV with B abortus strain RB51 (n = 10), SC with B abortus strain RB51 (n = 5), or SC with B abortus strain 19 (n = 5); controls received pyrogen-free saline solution SC (n = 2). Blood samples were collected periodically for TNF-α assays. At necropsy, 8 to 12 weeks after vaccination, placental fluids and fetal blood were collected for TNF-α analysis and placental tissues were collected for immunohistochemical detection of TNF-α.

Results

Radioimmunoassays indicated no increase in TNF-α concentration in blood from IV or SC vaccinated cattle, compared with controls. Similarly, TNF-α concentrations in amniotic and allantoic fluids from SC vaccinated cattle were not different from values for controls. Although only IV vaccinated cattle developed placentitis, immunohistochemical analysis for TNF-α revealed increased immunoreactivity within placental trophoblastic epithelial cells of SC and IV vaccinated cattle.

Conclusions

SC vaccination for prevention of brucellosis, using recommended adult dosages, does not result in increase of TNF-α concentration in plasma, serum, or placental fluids; however, vaccination of pregnant cattle stimulates trophoblastic epithelial cells to express TNF-α, although the physiologic and quantitative importance of this expression remains unknown. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:153–156)

SUMMARY

Objective

To determine the influence of brucellosis vaccination on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) con-centrations in pregnant cattle and the possible role of the bovine placenta in TNF-α production.

Animals

Polled Hereford heifers obtained from a nonvaccinated, brucellosis-free herd and bred at 16 to 27 months at age. All cattle were seronegative for Brucella abortus by results of the standard tube agglutination test.

Procedure

At 6 months' gestation, cattle were vaccinated IV with B abortus strain RB51 (n = 10), SC with B abortus strain RB51 (n = 5), or SC with B abortus strain 19 (n = 5); controls received pyrogen-free saline solution SC (n = 2). Blood samples were collected periodically for TNF-α assays. At necropsy, 8 to 12 weeks after vaccination, placental fluids and fetal blood were collected for TNF-α analysis and placental tissues were collected for immunohistochemical detection of TNF-α.

Results

Radioimmunoassays indicated no increase in TNF-α concentration in blood from IV or SC vaccinated cattle, compared with controls. Similarly, TNF-α concentrations in amniotic and allantoic fluids from SC vaccinated cattle were not different from values for controls. Although only IV vaccinated cattle developed placentitis, immunohistochemical analysis for TNF-α revealed increased immunoreactivity within placental trophoblastic epithelial cells of SC and IV vaccinated cattle.

Conclusions

SC vaccination for prevention of brucellosis, using recommended adult dosages, does not result in increase of TNF-α concentration in plasma, serum, or placental fluids; however, vaccination of pregnant cattle stimulates trophoblastic epithelial cells to express TNF-α, although the physiologic and quantitative importance of this expression remains unknown. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:153–156)

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